Military veterans – 20th CVETSMEM http://20thcvetsmem.org/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 04:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://20thcvetsmem.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1.png Military veterans – 20th CVETSMEM http://20thcvetsmem.org/ 32 32 K9s For Warriors donates therapy dogs to Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department https://20thcvetsmem.org/k9s-for-warriors-donates-therapy-dogs-to-jacksonville-fire-and-rescue-department/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/k9s-for-warriors-donates-therapy-dogs-to-jacksonville-fire-and-rescue-department/ K9s For Warriors, the nation’s largest provider of trained service dogs for military veterans, recently announced the donation of two therapy dogs, Gunner and Cash, to the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department as part of its Station Dog program. As part of its mission, K9s For Warriors partners with law enforcement and first aid agencies […]]]>

K9s For Warriors, the nation’s largest provider of trained service dogs for military veterans, recently announced the donation of two therapy dogs, Gunner and Cash, to the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department as part of its Station Dog program.

As part of its mission, K9s For Warriors partners with law enforcement and first aid agencies to provide reliable, high quality K9s that provide emotional support to law enforcement officers, firefighters , dispatchers, victims, and others repeatedly exposed to traumatic events in the line of conduct.

Both Black Labs, Gunner and Cash, are American Kennel Club recognized therapy dogs. They become respectively the 15th and 16th dogs to be adopted through the K9s For Warriors’ Station Dog program.

Station dogs alleviate the emotional stress common in this line of public service. Station dogs are made up of retired service dogs or dogs that have received extensive training from professional trainers but were not quite cut out to be service dogs.

These dogs are not diverted from any military veteran of the K9s For Warriors program, and departments receiving these station dogs receive them free of charge. The K9s For Warriors Station Dog program is an American Kennel Club recognized therapy dog ​​program.


“First responders are routinely exposed to traumatic events and stressors that have a similar impact to what our veterans experience on a daily basis,” said Rory Diamond, CEO of K9s For Warriors. “The primary goal of our Station Dog program is to help alleviate stress and improve emotional well-being through the level of companionship these dogs provide. We couldn’t be more thrilled that Station Dogs Gunner and Cash are working alongside members of the JFRD Peer Support Team to do just that for our local heroes.

JFRD’s Peer Support Team provides first responders with resources to help them better manage the traumas and stressors they experience on the job. The gunner joins position no. 52 at 6130 Collins Road, and Cash joins station no. 71 at 325 2nd Ave. S. where they will be involved in their station’s peer support team.

“When our firefighters have gone to a bad scene or are struggling with job-related stress, Gunner and Cash provide solace and companionship, said JFRD Fire Chief Keith Powers. “They have the ability to feel the distress, to reach out to these people, to help them relax and get over this stress. They are a very important part of our department.

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Sergeant CPD Military Liaison Program honored for helping veterans https://20thcvetsmem.org/sergeant-cpd-military-liaison-program-honored-for-helping-veterans/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 01:48:00 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/sergeant-cpd-military-liaison-program-honored-for-helping-veterans/ CINCINNATI — The Cincinnati Police Department’s community policing efforts to help veterans in distress are gaining national recognition. After years of community service, CPD Sergeant and Army Veteran Dave Corlett founded the Military Liaison Group to make a difference while on patrol. “This program took me back to where I felt like I was making […]]]>

CINCINNATI — The Cincinnati Police Department’s community policing efforts to help veterans in distress are gaining national recognition.

After years of community service, CPD Sergeant and Army Veteran Dave Corlett founded the Military Liaison Group to make a difference while on patrol.

“This program took me back to where I felt like I was making a difference, and that was my goal as a police officer initially,” said Dave Corlett.

More than 30% of staff officers at Cincinnati are military veterans, according to Corlett. As such, he saw an opportunity to be a bridge to the distressed veterans he and his fellow officers encounter on dispatch calls.

The concept is relatively simple: veterans currently serving in the department respond to scenes where military veterans are in distress. It could be a domestic call or even a situation where the veteran is threatening suicide.

“The communication that happens between two veterans is very different from the communication that would happen between a law enforcement officer and a veteran, Corlett said. “The ability to have relatable experiences – you can’t get better than that.”

This is part of the de-escalation process and often opens the door to treatment or services that the veteran had no idea were available.

“I am a Gulf War veteran so I was no longer in the military and was serving here in the police department in June 1992. I only learned about five or six years ago that I I was eligible for health care at the VA,” Corlett said, “So it struck me that if I didn’t know these things, the other veterans didn’t either.”

The success of the program and its simplistic approach caught the attention of the Ohio Attorney General.

“I was so impressed with this that I immediately spoke to my team and said we need to get this out statewide,” Attorney General Dave Yost said. “We need to help other departments start doing that.”

Working with Corlett, the AG’s office created the Veterans Intervention Program Guidelines for other police departments in the state.

“There’s a lot of talk about de-escalation and this is just one tool in that de-escalation toolkit,” Yost said. “Instead of hooking someone up and taking them to the county, connecting them to resources to help them is a much better outcome.”

While he said the program does not prevent arrests if the situation warrants it, it puts veterans on the path, whether through veterans court or the VA health system, to redress their situation.

The idea caught the eye of Florida Republican Congresswoman Maria Salazar, who shoved the ‘Service Act’ onto the House floor in the fall, which would open the door to grants for the forces. order across the country wishing to implement the idea via a pilot program.

This week, the Department of Justice will recognize the efforts of Sergeant Corlett, the Cincinnati Police Department and the Cincinnati VA as the recipient of the 2021 L. Anthony Sutin Award for Innovative Law Enforcement and Community Partnerships .

“Creative and meaningful partnerships between law enforcement and the community are at the heart of community policing,” said Robert Chapman, Acting Director of the PSC Office. “To see how the efforts of dedicated individuals to help veterans in need have impacted an entire state – and perhaps the country – shows how community policing can change lives. It is a privilege to honor this team.

The ceremony will take place at the Cincinnati Music Hall on August 11 at 1 p.m.

If you have a veteran story to tell in your community, email homefront@wcpo.com. You can also join the Homefront Facebook group, follow Craig McKee on Facebook, and find more Homefront stories here.

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Scholarship to help veterans and active military get into farming https://20thcvetsmem.org/scholarship-to-help-veterans-and-active-military-get-into-farming/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 03:51:33 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/scholarship-to-help-veterans-and-active-military-get-into-farming/ LITTLE ROCK — Military veterans and active military personnel have until September 1 to apply for a $1,000 Homegrown by Heroes scholarship. The financial award — offered through a partnership between the Arkansas Department of Agriculture and the Arkansas Farm Credit Associations — is for attendance at the Center for Arkansas Farm and Food’s Farm […]]]>

LITTLE ROCK — Military veterans and active military personnel have until September 1 to apply for a $1,000 Homegrown by Heroes scholarship.

The financial award — offered through a partnership between the Arkansas Department of Agriculture and the Arkansas Farm Credit Associations — is for attendance at the Center for Arkansas Farm and Food’s Farm School. Applications are available at agriculture.arkansas.gov/arkansas-department-of-agriculture-programs.

Homegrown By Heroes is an Arkansas Department of Agriculture program that helps veteran farmers market their agricultural products by labeling them as grown by veterans.

“We are proud to partner with Farm Credit to provide scholarship to the men and women who have served our country in the military, said Arkansas Secretary of Agriculture Wes Ward. “Military service members have many skills that make them excellent candidates for successful careers in agriculture. It is an honor to offer them this scholarship as a token of appreciation for their service to our country.

The agricultural school is an 11-month program at the Milo Shult Ag Research and Extension Center at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. It combines specialty crop farming with courses in production, business and legal issues. The approach is specifically designed for beginning fruit, flower, vegetable and herb farmers who want to sell in local and regional markets.

The 2023 program begins in January, with classes and agricultural work scheduled for approximately 20 hours per week, Monday through Thursday. The total cost of the program is $2,500. More information is available at LearnToFarm.org.

Fellows are selected based on their career goals, farm/ranch goals, experience, and financial need. Preference is given to Arkansas Homegrown By Heroes members, but membership is not required.

“Arkansas Farm Credit Associations appreciates the service that Arkansas veterans and current military personnel provide to our country,” said Brandon Haberer, CEO and President of Farm Credit of Western Arkansas. “We are pleased to help service members pursue careers in agriculture by sponsoring these scholarships.”

Print Headline: Scholarship to help veterans and active military get into farming

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Charlotte Fire joins the American Veterans Hall of Fame to prevent suicide https://20thcvetsmem.org/charlotte-fire-joins-the-american-veterans-hall-of-fame-to-prevent-suicide/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 12:13:47 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/charlotte-fire-joins-the-american-veterans-hall-of-fame-to-prevent-suicide/ ​ The Charlotte Fire Department joins the American Veterans Hall of Fame and community partners on Saturday for the fourth annual Mental Health Awareness Walk. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, with nearly 46,000 deaths in 2020. That’s about […]]]>

With the constant alarm sounding at a fire station, firefighters often don’t have time to deal with one grim experience before tackling the next.

“Our peer support team have all been through something very difficult and each of them has a diverse experience they can share, and some have been through untold things,” Starnes said. “But each of them has the courage to come in and listen and say, ‘I know how you feel’ and mean it.”

Therapy can be an effective tool to restore or maintain mental health. Discussing difficult experiences and emotions with a trained therapist can be difficult, but not processing them can make those experiences and emotions last longer.

In addition to the Peer Support Team, Charlotte Fire staff members have a wealth of behavioral health resources available to them. From the Employee Assistance Program, which provides free, confidential services, to the North Carolina Firefighters Peer Support Network, and more, the effort to ensure healthy mental well-being is paramount to the Charlotte Fire Chief Reginald Johnson.

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Opinion: There’s a good reason why Jon Stewart is mad at Ted Cruz https://20thcvetsmem.org/opinion-theres-a-good-reason-why-jon-stewart-is-mad-at-ted-cruz/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 01:36:00 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/opinion-theres-a-good-reason-why-jon-stewart-is-mad-at-ted-cruz/ Last week, while Senate Democrats voted unanimously to pass the measure, Republicans voted to block the Honoring Our PACT Act, which aims to provide assistance to veterans who have fallen ill from exposure to fireplaces during their military service. Stewart, the former late-night comedian-turned-activist was arguably the most vocal critic of the GOP lawmakers who […]]]>
Last week, while Senate Democrats voted unanimously to pass the measure, Republicans voted to block the Honoring Our PACT Act, which aims to provide assistance to veterans who have fallen ill from exposure to fireplaces during their military service.
Stewart, the former late-night comedian-turned-activist was arguably the most vocal critic of the GOP lawmakers who rejected the measure in that procedural vote, a move that seemed likely to delay the measure until the return of the legislators from their summer recess in September. .

Veterans don’t have the luxury of waiting another month, he said.

“Tell their cancer to take a break,” he told CNN a day after learning the measure had stalled. “Tell their cancer to stay home and go visit their families.”

Democratic Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer held the new vote on the measure Tuesday night, giving Republicans a chance to prove they actually support the troops they so often pay tribute to.

The GOP tried to score political points by delaying this vital bill that would help an estimated 3.5 million veterans. This problem is literally a matter of life and death for those made ill by exposure to toxins emitted from combustion fireplaces.

What Veterans Day Means to Me and My Family
Burn pits were commonly used to burn waste, munitions, hazardous materials and chemical compounds at military sites throughout Iraq and Afghanistan until around 2010. They were often operated on or near military bases, releasing dangerous toxins into the air that could have long-term health conditions. But in the past, more than 70% of claims filed for exposure to the burn pit were denied by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

The PACT law would remedy this. The legislation would provide hundreds of billions of dollars over the next decade to help them. And in the future, veterans exposed to fireplaces will now be presumed to have contracted certain respiratory diseases and cancers, which will make it easier for them to obtain disability benefits.

So why did Senate Republicans block legislation that would help millions of vets last week? Could it be that the GOP doesn’t want to give President Biden a legislative victory on an issue he’s championed for a long time — especially so close to November’s midterm elections?

Some speculate Republicans backtracked as part of a backlash after being surprised by the deal announced last week by Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer – forged in secret with West Virginia Democrat Joe Manchin – on legislation to fight climate change, help reduce prescription drug costs and increase tax revenue.
Ted Cruz's stance on same-sex marriage raises a huge red flag
Republican Sen. Ted Cruz — who not only voted against the bill last Wednesday to help veterans but, ignominiously, was seen punching fellow GOP senators in celebration of the legislation’s blockage — claimed that it was because the measure contained a budget ‘trick’.”
Republican Senator Pat Toomey, who was a leading voice opposing the bill, said in a statement after last week’s vote that scuttled the bill that if he were to approve the bill in its current form, “Congress would effectively use a major veterans care bill to hide a massive, unrelated spending spree. Cruz told TMZ that the bill was “part of the spending uncontrollable from the left”.

But Cruz and his Republican colleagues in the Senate in mid-June passed a nearly identical version of the bill, which obliterated the chamber by an 84-14 vote (the 14 “no” votes coming from Republicans).

Stewart, who has been publicly advocating for this legislation since September 2020 (and who has also championed efforts to increase federal funding for 9/11 first responders) cried Cruz on Twitter. “This is not a game. Real people’s lives are at stake…People who fought for your life,” he wrote.
Stewart is 100% right about the Republican game. The PACT Act passed the House last month with only minor changes — but those minor changes prompted another Senate vote. Last week, 25 GOP senators, including Cruz, reversed their previous “yes” votes to block him.

Democratic Sen. Jon Tester, who co-drafted the bill with Republican Kansas Sen. Jerry Moran, said Republicans’ explanations for why they withdrew support in last week’s vote did not hold. just not the road.

“My colleagues can invent all sorts of excuses as to why they decided to change their vote for this bill,” he said.

All in all, this amounts to the worst kind of political game, with the lives of American veterans at stake. They deserve much better. And Tuesday night, they got it.

This exhibit has been updated to reflect the latest vote in the Senate.

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‘He is my hero.’ 10 veterans, including 2 brothers, honored at Quilts of Valor ceremony in Clinton https://20thcvetsmem.org/he-is-my-hero-10-veterans-including-2-brothers-honored-at-quilts-of-valor-ceremony-in-clinton/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 09:08:49 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/he-is-my-hero-10-veterans-including-2-brothers-honored-at-quilts-of-valor-ceremony-in-clinton/ By the time Ronald Miller and his wife Noreen showed up for the Quilts of Bravery Ceremony at the American Legion in Clinton, an hour late, nine military veterans were milling around the main room, wrapped in vibrant quilts and accepting the congratulations from family and friends. It was then that host Jane Dougherty’s voice […]]]>

By the time Ronald Miller and his wife Noreen showed up for the Quilts of Bravery Ceremony at the American Legion in Clinton, an hour late, nine military veterans were milling around the main room, wrapped in vibrant quilts and accepting the congratulations from family and friends.

It was then that host Jane Dougherty’s voice rose above the hubbub.

Dougherty, along with Nancy Burns of Old Saybrook, represented the Quilts of Valor Foundation, which blankets war-affected military and veterans with ‘healing quilts’, as she put it, made by teams of volunteers .

“Everyone,” Dougherty said, “Ronald Miller was able to come, he and his wife came from Norwalk and got lost and they’re here and we’re going to honor him pretty much the same way we honored everybody. “

Everyone applauded. Many of the 75 people present remained, including Charlie Miller, who had been awaiting the arrival of his older brother and sister-in-law since the presentation began.

There was also Joe Rand from Clinton, who served in the Navy during Vietnam.

“It’s a work of art,” he said after the ceremony, of his quilt, which was intricately patterned with squares of white and red stripes, as well as white stars on a blue background. . “These are all works of art.”

Beside him was Robert Crum of Branford, an Army security officer stationed in Japan and Turkey from 1962 to 1964.

“The quality is just amazing,” he said.

“I was between the wars, but when you consider the troops coming back from Korea and Vietnam, it has nothing to do with WWII. There were no parades for those guys. There was nothing. For these people to do this for us, it’s unbelievable, really unbelievable,” Crum said.

Robert Nettleton, a member of the 101st Airborne who served the Army from 1962 to 1965, uttered a similar refrain.

“It’s time for something to come back to us,” he said, as most of the attendees returned to their seats, with Ronald Miller and the Miller family in front of the room.

For Charlie Miller, it’s no wonder so many people stayed.

“My brother is a hero,” he said. “My hero.”

Their father died in 1962, he said. Charlie was 5 years old. Ronald was 20. “I’m 65 and he’s 80,” Charlie said. “There are 15 years and seven days that separate us, but we talk to each other, we look alike.” Among seven children, Ronald was the eldest. “He helped our mother buy a house and helped her raise the rest of us.”

It’s one of the reasons, Charlie said, “he was always the person I looked up to.”

When Ronald was in Vietnam, serving in Cam Ranh Bay as part of the Army’s Fifth Cavalry Regiment Quartermaster Corps, “it was a big deal for me to have a brother in service”, said Charlie, who was going to join the Navy. from 1975 to 1979. “I used to show pictures to all my friends and all my teachers.”

There was that too. “Before he went to war, he took some of his tools and he put together a toolbox for me,” he said. “I wasn’t much older than 7 and it was my first toolbox and I just retired as a Subaru mechanic after 42 years.”

A few months ago, he was working on the Subaru of Bobbi Racette, a Branford resident involved in several military and veteran support initiatives.

“My husband and Charlie started talking, and we had just gone to a [quilts of valor] ceremony, and he was telling Charlie about it, Racette said, watching Dougherty wrap Miller in a blue and yellow plaid quilt. “That’s when we heard about his brother Ron.”

Soon Miller, along with his wife Noreen and Charlie, was posing for pictures.

“I’m glad you made it,” Dougherty said.

“Me too,” Noreen replied. “What a privilege. It made me cry.”

If you know a veteran you would like to honor, visit www.qovf.org, find the “take action” tab and click on “request a quilt”.

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Service clubs help see veterans honored at Eastpointe – Macomb Daily https://20thcvetsmem.org/service-clubs-help-see-veterans-honored-at-eastpointe-macomb-daily/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 05:43:32 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/service-clubs-help-see-veterans-honored-at-eastpointe-macomb-daily/ When the City of Eastpointe undertook city office renovations years ago, the plan was to relocate the existing Veterans Memorial. Members of Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 154 set out to raise funds to ensure that veterans of all conflicts in the town of Eastpointe would continue to be honored on a memorial on town […]]]>

When the City of Eastpointe undertook city office renovations years ago, the plan was to relocate the existing Veterans Memorial.

Members of Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 154 set out to raise funds to ensure that veterans of all conflicts in the town of Eastpointe would continue to be honored on a memorial on town property.

Photos submitted by Linda May: Service clubs and <a class=veterans organizations have been a big part of the Eastpointe Veterans Memorial, from its inception to its upkeep today. (PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY LINDA MAY)” width=”2016″ data-sizes=”auto” src=”https://i0.wp.com/www.macombdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Eastpointe-Memoiral-Vietnam-.jpg?fit=620%2C9999px&ssl=1″ srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.macombdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Eastpointe-Memoiral-Vietnam-.jpg?fit=620%2C9999px&ssl=1 620w,https://i0.wp.com/www.macombdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Eastpointe-Memoiral-Vietnam-.jpg?fit=780%2C9999px&ssl=1 780w,https://i0.wp.com/www.macombdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Eastpointe-Memoiral-Vietnam-.jpg?fit=810%2C9999px&ssl=1 810w,https://i0.wp.com/www.macombdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Eastpointe-Memoiral-Vietnam-.jpg?fit=1280%2C9999px&ssl=1 1280w,https://i0.wp.com/www.macombdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Eastpointe-Memoiral-Vietnam-.jpg?fit=1860%2C9999px&ssl=1 1860w”/>
Photos submitted by Linda May: Service clubs and veterans organizations have been a big part of the Eastpointe Veterans Memorial, from its inception to its upkeep today. (PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY LINDA MAY)

The memorial, originally established in 1970, bore the names of WWII and Vietnam casualties from the area. Later, the Eastpointe Veterans Memorial honored those who served in the Korean War and the Persian Gulf War, in Iraq and Afghanistan.

These tributes are very personal.

“It was built by the Eastpointe Lions Club,” former Chapter 154 president Patrick Daniels said. The new one was built when the city was going to rebuild the city hall and wanted to move it to the back of the building and we said no. Ken Theil, Greg Bowman and myself got involved with Suzanne Pixley and the city manager to keep it front. Greg coordinated all the construction.

Chapter 154 contributed $15,000 toward the cost of the new memorial, which is highly visible at the corner of northbound Gratiot Avenue and Aurora Street.

Photos submitted by Linda May: Service clubs and veterans organizations have been a big part of the Eastpointe Veterans Memorial, from its inception to its upkeep today. (PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY LINDA MAY)

“The World War II plate was in a closet in the old one-room schoolhouse. I said we had to have it, and the school board agreed to give it to us. The Vietnam plates were out of the old memorial. Everyone grew up in East Detroit or still lives there today.

Genealogists Ruth and Charlie Babcock have conducted decades of research on Michigan veterans for various memorials.

“Ruth and Charlie did the research for us and we sold the bricks to help offset the cost, Daniels said.

“The guys I grew up with were Ronnie Lee Obney who lived on Brittany Street and David Dell Graham who grew up in Tuscany about eight houses away from me. His family moved to Cass City when he was around 16. Ronnie’s brother, Gary, still lives in the family home in Brittany. Years ago, I used to stop by to see his father and visit him. He became my buddy and one year I picked him up and pushed him in a wheelchair for the city’s Memorial Day Parade. We just had a great day. Ronnie’s mother was a Sunday school teacher and we used to meet at his house to catch the bus to Sunday school,” Daniels said.

Ronnie Lee Obney is commemorated on both the Eastpointe monument and on Daniels’ Harley-Davidson motorcycle. At a Harley Owners Group meeting, a man presented Daniels with a set of government-issued dog tags bearing Obney’s name. Obney’s parents gave the tags to Daniels’ cousin, and they changed hands until they came to Daniels as a keepsake.

“Ronnie wore them when he was killed in Vietnam in 1968,” Daniels said.

Photos submitted by Linda May: Service clubs and veterans organizations have been a big part of the Eastpointe Veterans Memorial, from its inception to its upkeep today.  (PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY LINDA MAY)
Photos submitted by Linda May: Service clubs and veterans organizations have been a big part of the Eastpointe Veterans Memorial, from its inception to its upkeep today. (PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY LINDA MAY)

An inscription on the memorial reads: “In memory of all veterans of the Korean War. They told us: we will have peace even if we have to fight for it. We fought in the mountains of Heartbreak Ridge and landed at Inchon. We froze in the winter and baked in the summer sun. At times we were vastly outnumbered, but we always fought and many of us gave our lives for freedom, justice and peace.

At least three victims whose recording house was East Detroit are identified as being from the Korean War.

Another inscription on the plaque reads: ‘In memory of all veterans of the Persian Gulf War.’There is no one more dedicated, more committed to the hard work of freedom, than every soldier and sailor, every marine, airman and coast guard, every man and woman now serves in the Persian Gulf.—President George Bush.Quote is from President George HW’s State of the Union Address Bush in 1991.

A plaque unveiling was held on November 15, 2014. VVA Chapter 154 is committed to the upkeep of the monument.

Realizing the importance of the memorial to local veterans, Brett Meyers of Boy Scout Troop 154 ​​decided that its repair would make a good Eagle Scout project.

“When he was looking for a project, I gave him the VVA 154 phone number and he contacted President Gary Purcell,” said Maria Myers, Brett’s mother. “Brett loves military history. It was his way of giving back.

When Brett Myers contacted VVA Chapter 154, he learned that many of the names carved into the brick pavers that support the memorial were nearly unreadable, but could be restored by painting them with a special black paint. He scheduled crews to work for two weekends and extra days.

Working in extreme heat, scouts and other volunteers knelt or lay down on the hard brick surface and began the painstaking work of making the names in the bricks dark and legible again. Passers-by stopped to inquire about their task. They heard about the memorial from the Boy Scouts.

Routine cleaning of the monument is supported by VVA Chapter 154. Member Dave Porter leads a team that maintains the memorials and grounds around the Eastpointe Memorial, and the Vietnam Memorials at Freedom Hill County Park in Sterling Heights. A new memorial is planned in the park for post-9/11 veterans.

Photos submitted by Linda May: Service clubs and veterans organizations have been a big part of the Eastpointe Veterans Memorial, from its inception to its upkeep today.  (PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY LINDA MAY)
Photos submitted by Linda May: Service clubs and veterans organizations have been a big part of the Eastpointe Veterans Memorial, from its inception to its upkeep today. (PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY LINDA MAY)

Etched brick pavers from other veterans service organizations and service clubs support the maintenance and improvements of the Eastpointe monument. Veterans buy the bricks for themselves or with the names of comrades. Anyone can buy a brick just to say thank you for the vets service.

The flagpoles are from the Rotary Club of Eastpointe and American Legion Post 570; pews are from the Eastpointe Lions Club, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 6782 Shafer-Rachelle and its Auxiliary, and VVA Chapter 154. Pavers were donated by the Kiwanis Club of Eastpointe, East Detroit Roseville American Legion Post and Ladies Auxiliary 251, East Detroit Moose Family Center, VFW Bruce Post 1146, VFW Post 2358 and VVA Detroit Chapter 9, Knights of Columbus Council 3042, VFW Fred Quant Post 3901 Algonac, Oddfellows 496 and Disabled American Veterans Chapter 107.

Applications are available at the memorial site or at the VVA Chapter 154 Veteran Support Center, 18025 15 Mile Road, Clinton Township. The brick pavers are 4 inches by 8 inches with three type lines and are available at $50 for individuals and $100 for nonprofit service organizations.

“We’re running brick money,” Purcell said. “Every time we take money and put bricks, we help maintain the monument. Over time the names faded away until you could barely read them. Brett puts the black paint back on to make them legible. We and the Catholic veterans offered to help with the costs, but Brett took care of everything.

“Chapter 154 has big congregation guys in East Detroit and Roseville and the Shores,” Purcell said. Years ago, north of about 15 Mile Road were “the boonies”, so many of the people who were drafted were from East Detroit and Roseville. A lot of guys from this chapter knew a lot of these guys on this memorial.

Send news from service clubs and veterans organizations to Linda May at lindamay@ameritech.net or call the landline 586-791-8116.

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Kim threatens to use nukes amid tensions with US and South Korea https://20thcvetsmem.org/kim-threatens-to-use-nukes-amid-tensions-with-us-and-south-korea/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 18:16:28 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/kim-threatens-to-use-nukes-amid-tensions-with-us-and-south-korea/ SEOUL, South Korea — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has warned he is ready to use his nuclear weapons in possible military conflicts with the United States and South Korea, state media said Thursday, as he unleashed fiery rhetoric against rivals he says are pushing the Korean peninsula. on the brink of war. Kim’s […]]]>

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has warned he is ready to use his nuclear weapons in possible military conflicts with the United States and South Korea, state media said Thursday, as he unleashed fiery rhetoric against rivals he says are pushing the Korean peninsula. on the brink of war.

Kim’s speech to veterans on the 69th anniversary of the end of the 1950-53 Korean War was apparently aimed at bolstering internal unity in the impoverished country amid pandemic-related economic hardship. While Kim has increasingly threatened his rivals with nuclear weapons, he is unlikely to use them first against the senior military of the United States and its allies, observers say.

“Our armed forces are fully prepared to respond to any crisis, and our nation’s nuclear war deterrent is also ready to mobilize its absolute power conscientiously, exactly, and promptly in accordance with its mission,” Kim said in his speech Wednesday. according to the Korean official press release. Central News Agency.

He accused the United States of “demonizing” North Korea to justify its hostile policies. Kim said regular military drills between the United States and South Korea that he said were aimed at the North highlighted American aspects of “double standards” and “gangsterism” as they characterized military activities as North Korea’s routine – an apparent reference to its missile tests – of provocations or threats.

Kim also alleged that the new South Korean government of President Yoon Suk Yeol is run by “confrontational maniacs” and “gangsters” who have gone further than previous conservative South Korean governments. Since taking office in May, the Yoon government has moved to bolster Seoul’s military alliance with the United States and bolster its own capability to neutralize North Korean nuclear threats, including a preemptive strike capability.

“Talking about military action against our nation, which has absolute weapons that they fear most, is absurd and is a very dangerous suicidal action,” Kim said. “Such a dangerous attempt will be immediately punished by our powerful force, and Yoon Suk Yeol’s government and its army will be wiped out.”

South Korea expressed “deep regret” over Kim’s threat and said it remained ready to meet any provocation from North Korea in a “powerful and effective manner”.

In a statement read by spokesperson Kang In-sun, Yoon’s presidential national security office said South Korea will safeguard its national security and the safety of its citizens on the basis of a strong alliance with the United States. He urged North Korea to resume talks to take steps towards denuclearization.

Earlier on Thursday, South Korea’s Defense Ministry reiterated its previous position that it had strengthened its military capability and joint defense posture with the United States to deal with escalating North Korean nuclear threats.

In April, Kim said North Korea could use nuclear weapons preemptively if threatened, saying it would “never be confined to the sole mission of war deterrence.” Kim’s army has also tested nuclear-capable missiles that put both the continental United States and South Korea within striking range. US and South Korean officials have repeatedly said in recent months that North Korea is ready to conduct its first nuclear test in five years.

Kim is seeking greater public support as his country’s economy has been battered by pandemic-related border closures, U.S. sanctions and his own mismanagement. In May, North Korea also admitted its first outbreak of COVID-19, though the scale of the illness and death is widely disputed in a country that lacks the modern medical capacity to deal with it.

“Kim’s rhetoric inflates external threats to justify his military and economically struggling regime,” said Leif-Eric Easley, a professor at Ewha University in Seoul. “North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs are in violation of international law, but Kim is trying to portray his destabilizing weapons buildup as a righteous self-defense effort.”

Experts say North Korea will likely step up its threats against the United States and South Korea as allies prepare to expand summer drills. In recent years, the South Korean and American militaries have canceled or reduced some of their regular exercises due to concerns about COVID-19 and to support the now stalled US-led diplomacy aimed at convince North Korea to abandon its nuclear program in exchange for economic and political benefits.

During Wednesday’s speech, Kim said his government had recently set tasks to improve its military capacity more quickly to respond to military pressure campaigns by its enemies, suggesting it intended to carry out a nuclear test. expected.

But Cheong Seong-Chang, of the private Sejong Institute in South Korea, said North Korea was unlikely to conduct its nuclear test until China, its main ally and biggest aid benefactor, hold its Communist Party congress in the fall. He said China was concerned that a North Korean nuclear test would give the United States justification to strengthen its security partnerships with its allies which it could use to control Chinese influence in the region.

North Korea recently said it was poised to ride out the COVID-19 outbreak amid plummeting fever cases, but experts say it’s unclear whether the country can lift soon its strict restrictions as it could face a viral resurgence later this year. At Wednesday’s event, Kim, veterans and others did not wear masks, state media photos showed. On Thursday, North Korea reported 11 cases of fever, a huge drop from the peak of around 400,000 a day in May.

North Korea has rejected US and South Korean offers of medical relief items. He also said he would not resume talks with the United States unless he first abandoned his hostile policies on the North, in an apparent reference to US-led sanctions and drills. South Korean-American military.

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Florida schools allow veterans to teach without a degree https://20thcvetsmem.org/florida-schools-allow-veterans-to-teach-without-a-degree/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 19:03:04 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/florida-schools-allow-veterans-to-teach-without-a-degree/ Florida has 9,000 teaching vacancies to fill before the end of the summer and the start of the new academic year. The state Department of Education announced last week that military veterans can now fill these roles. “Our public schools are truly at a crisis level seeing this massive number of vacancies,” Andrew Spar, president […]]]>

Florida has 9,000 teaching vacancies to fill before the end of the summer and the start of the new academic year. The state Department of Education announced last week that military veterans can now fill these roles.

“Our public schools are truly at a crisis level seeing this massive number of vacancies,” Andrew Spar, president of the Florida Education Association, told ABC Action News. “In 2010, 8,000 Florida college and university graduates became teachers. This number was between 2,000 and 3,000 for the year just ended. This is a significant drop.

Veterans will now receive a five-year voucher that will allow them to teach in the classroom without typical accreditation or the necessary training requirements that other certified teachers must possess.

The move is part of an $8.6 million statewide initiative to provide careers and workforce training to veterans and their dependents.

“We owe the freedoms we enjoy as Americans to our military veterans, and I am focused on ensuring Florida is the best state in the nation for those who have served to find good jobs, start or grow businesses. and support their families,” Florida said. Governor Ron DeSantis in a statement. “Business is booming in Florida, and employers are looking for the leadership skills, training and teamwork that military veterans bring to the workforce.”

The state Department of Education currently expects veteran applicants without a degree seeking teaching positions to have at least 60 college credits and a base average of 2.5 GPA. They must also pass the subject examination for bachelor level subjects.

In addition, their service must amount to 48 months in the army, with an honorable or medical discharge. If they are hired by a school, they must be supervised by an educational mentor.

Teachers and local unions, meanwhile, believe the move will lower the educational standard of Florida schools.

“You can’t just throw a hot body into a classroom, that’s not the answer,” Barry Dubin, president of the Sarasota County Teachers’ Association, told the Herald Tribune.

Although the shortage is dire, the decision to use veterans as a stopgap measure has educators questioning the state’s criteria for teachers.

“Many people have gone through many hurdles and hurdles to get a proper teaching certificate,” said Carmen Ward, president of the Alachua County Teachers’ Union. “(Educators) are very dismayed that now someone who only has a high school diploma can pass the test and can easily get a five-year temporary certificate.”

Sarah Sicard is an editor at the Military Times. Previously, she served as digital editor of the Military Times and editor-in-chief of the Army Times. Other work can be found in National Defense Magazine, Task & Purpose and Defense News.

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Austintown veteran looks back on 20 years of Navy service | News, Sports, Jobs https://20thcvetsmem.org/austintown-veteran-looks-back-on-20-years-of-navy-service-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 04:07:19 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/austintown-veteran-looks-back-on-20-years-of-navy-service-news-sports-jobs/ Photo submitted by Kenneth W. Bancroft of Austintown aboard the USS Ranger in April 1965. Aboard the ship, Bancroft was an aircraft mechanic during the Vietnam War. EDITOR’S NOTE: To suggest a veteran for this series, which runs weekly until Veterans Day, email Metro editor Marly Reichert at mreichert@tribtoday.com . AUSTINTOWN […]]]>

Photo submitted by Kenneth W. Bancroft of Austintown aboard the USS Ranger in April 1965. Aboard the ship, Bancroft was an aircraft mechanic during the Vietnam War.

EDITOR’S NOTE: To suggest a veteran for this series, which runs weekly until Veterans Day, email Metro editor Marly Reichert at mreichert@tribtoday.com .

AUSTINTOWN — When Kenneth W. Bancroft graduated from Mineral Ridge High School in 1957, he knew he was going to be drafted into the military.

What he didn’t know at the time was that he would continue to re-enlist and spend 20 years in the Navy.

“There was a draft at the time, and I decided I didn’t want to crawl somewhere on my stomach,” he said. “I decided the Navy was a better option than the Army – and it was. It’s something I’ve never regretted and I’m proud of my time in the Navy. married at 18 and joined the Navy at 19.

Before enlisting in 1958, Bancroft married his wife, Verna, and the two moved to Florida with him reporting to Naval Air Station Whiting Field.

“We were in Florida and I was trying to find a job in Cape Canaveral,” Bancroft said. “I didn’t understand, so I signed up for another four years.”

In the Navy, Bancroft was trained to be an aircraft mechanic.

He was sent to Naval Air Station Lemoore in California, and his squadron was assigned in 1963 to the USS Ranger, which was in the South China Sea during the Vietnam War.

“You’re not afraid of what’s happening or what might happen, Bancroft said. “You have to go. You’re just doing your job. You fix the planes, put them back in order and send the pilots on their way.

Bancroft said he worked 12-hour days seven days a week while on the Ranger.

“It was exhausting,” he said. “We were there for probably 30, 40 days straight and went to the Philippines for a week or two off and then we were out for another 30, 40 days. All you did was work, sleep and eat.

The work was so tiring, Bancroft said, that his sleeping quarters were three feet below the flight deck where repair work was carried out on planes and he slept well despite the loud noise.

“The only thing that woke you up was the call to work,” he said.

Bancroft said he continued to re-enlist because “I was happy in the Navy. I liked that.”

Bancroft was transferred in September 1965 to the USS Enterprise and remained in the South China Sea until February 1966.

The Navy then transferred Bancroft to Naval Air Station Memphis in Tennessee to learn how to be an instructor in refrigeration, ventilation, and air conditioning repair work.

“It was nice to have stability in Memphis with my family,” he said.

He remained there until 1970, when he was transferred to Naval Air Station Patuxent River in Maryland for five years, where he performed repair work on C-130 aircraft as part of a mission for Joint Chiefs of Staff.

C-130 planes would fly to submarines and send them encrypted messages, Bancroft said.

He ended his time in the Navy with a squadron of C-130s at a base in Rota, Spain.

“My wife and kids came with me and it was a great experience,” Bancroft said. “It was a transport squad, so they were transporting supplies to other naval bases in Europe.”

Bancroft decided in 1978 it was time to leave the Navy.

“I got tired of moving,” he said. “You didn’t know where you were going next. It was a good experience. We liked it, but it was time.

Because Bancroft and his wife’s families were in the Mahoning Valley, they moved to Austintown and he went to work at the General Motors plant in Lordstown.

He first worked on the assembly line and then moved to the materials section, retiring in 2001.

“I retired when I was 62,” Bancroft said. “I think that was enough. We enjoyed the retreat. We’ve been to Hawaii half a dozen times.

Kenneth W. Bancroft

AGE: 83

RESIDENCE: Austintown

BRANCH OF SERVICE: Navy

MILITARY HONOURS: Good Conduct Medal, Vietnam Service Award

OCCUPATION: Navy for 20 years then worked for General Motors in Lordstown for 22 years

FAMILY: Wife, Verna; son, Kenneth and daughter, Kelly



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