Military veterans – 20th CVETSMEM http://20thcvetsmem.org/ Fri, 30 Apr 2021 09:34:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.1 https://20thcvetsmem.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1.png Military veterans – 20th CVETSMEM http://20thcvetsmem.org/ 32 32 Veterans History Project Spotlights Military Moms with May Roundtable https://20thcvetsmem.org/veterans-history-project-spotlights-military-moms-with-may-roundtable/ https://20thcvetsmem.org/veterans-history-project-spotlights-military-moms-with-may-roundtable/#respond Fri, 30 Apr 2021 09:29:38 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/veterans-history-project-spotlights-military-moms-with-may-roundtable/ Mothers have volunteered to serve in the military since the War of Independence, where they have held traditional roles as nurses, seamstresses or cooks and, since 2015, in designated frontline combat roles. Thursday, May 6 at 12 p.m. EST, The Library of Congress’s Veterans History Project (VHP) invites the public to a virtual panel titled […]]]>


Mothers have volunteered to serve in the military since the War of Independence, where they have held traditional roles as nurses, seamstresses or cooks and, since 2015, in designated frontline combat roles. Thursday, May 6 at 12 p.m. EST, The Library of Congress’s Veterans History Project (VHP) invites the public to a virtual panel titled “Motherhood and the Military” on the VHP’s Facebook page. Panelists and moderator will be available to answer questions and address comments in the comments section.

Women made up 16.5% of all active-duty personnel in 2018 and make up 10% of all military veterans, a percentage that is likely to increase rapidly over the next decade, Pentagon data shows. . Women veterans occupy many roles, including that of mothers, but their contributions have often gone unrecognized, experts say.

Ahead of Mother’s Day, the panel will explore the intersection of the role of mothers and their connection to the military through the personal experiences of four female veterans.

“These strong women, just like those who came before them, remind us that while motherhood itself can be a full-time job, some mothers choose to continue serving in the military. They juggle the trials of parenthood and the responsibility of sustaining operations, dealing with deployment and the uncertainty that can accompany it all, ”said Elizabeth Estabrooks, acting executive director of the US Department of Veterans Affairs, Center for Women Veterans, and panel moderator.

The discussion will include special presentations by Senators Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill, and Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, both of whom are military veterans and mothers and serve on the Senate Armed Services Committee. Duckworth, a veteran of the Iraq War, is the first female double amputee to serve in the Senate, while Ernst was the first female combat veteran to serve in this chamber.

“The dual role of mother and soldier is not uncommon, but too often the story of service, sacrifice and impact on individual families is unknown,” said Duckworth, who made history. in 2018 when she took her newborn baby to a Senate vote. , just a few weeks after childbirth.

For her part, Ernst, a former company commander in Kuwait and Iraq, said it was not easy for her to leave her little girl for deployments “halfway around the world”.

“This experience has left me with deep appreciation for the sacrifice our military families make, especially our mothers in uniform,” said Ernst, the first woman to represent Iowa in Congress.

The panel will feature mothers from different military branches who have served our country through various generations and armed conflicts. They will discuss the trials of parenthood and meeting operational obligations, the heartache of deployments and separations and the uncertainty that comes with military service.

Program panelists include:

  • Chief Warrant Officer 5 Candy Martin (US Army, retired) – Martin served 38 years in the US Army Reserves, including a deployment to Iraq in 2005. His son, Lt. Tom Martin, was killed in fight two years later. She remains very active in the veteran community and with American Gold Star Mothers, Inc.
  • Command Sgt. Major Rue Mayweather (US Army, Retired) – Mayweather served 30 years in the US Army. She and her son, Captain Kenieth Mayweather, both deployed to Iraq in 2014 in support of Operation New Dawn.
  • Rupa Dainer (US Navy Veteran) – Dainer remembers having “50,000 emotions” when she learned of her deployment to Afghanistan in the parking lot of her daughters daycare in 2010. The naval medic going to war has helped her daughters, only 4 and 2 years old. years back then, go through the rollout with videos she made before she left, photos, and a timeline to track the days.
  • Mary Dever (US Air Force Veteran) – Dever has served as a broadcast journalist with the Air Force in Iraq and Afghanistan. She later became an instructor for the last three of her 10 years of service. When she got pregnant, she fought for her extended maternity leave and relied on an online support group for moms in uniform. Not wanting to leave his son for a new deployment, Dever left the military and began working with disabled American veterans.

Congress established the Veterans History Project in 2000 to collect, preserve and make accessible first-hand memories of United States veterans of World War I through the more recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, so that future generations can hear firsthand from veterans and better understand the realities of military service. For more information, visit www.loc.gov/vets/ or call the toll-free message line at (888) 371-5848. Subscribe to the VHP RSS to receive periodic updates of VHP news. Follow VHP on Facebook @vetshistoryproject.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, providing access to America’s creative record – and many documents from around the world – both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the United States Congress and the home of the US Copyright Office. Explore the collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit to loc.gov; Go to the official website for information on US Federal Law at congress.gov; and register authored works at copyright.gov.



Source link

]]>
https://20thcvetsmem.org/veterans-history-project-spotlights-military-moms-with-may-roundtable/feed/ 0
American communities unveil plans to fight homelessness crisis Voice of America https://20thcvetsmem.org/american-communities-unveil-plans-to-fight-homelessness-crisis-voice-of-america/ https://20thcvetsmem.org/american-communities-unveil-plans-to-fight-homelessness-crisis-voice-of-america/#respond Fri, 30 Apr 2021 07:19:33 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/american-communities-unveil-plans-to-fight-homelessness-crisis-voice-of-america/ WASHINGTON – Michael Doss cleans around his tent, the place he calls home in Washington, DC He’s not alone; dozens of people live outside in makeshift shelters within plain sight of monuments and federal government buildings. The nation’s capital, like many American communities, is struggling to cope with a growing homelessness crisis made worse by […]]]>


WASHINGTON – Michael Doss cleans around his tent, the place he calls home in Washington, DC He’s not alone; dozens of people live outside in makeshift shelters within plain sight of monuments and federal government buildings.

The nation’s capital, like many American communities, is struggling to cope with a growing homelessness crisis made worse by the historic economic downturn and the coronavirus pandemic.

“I was forced to live on the streets,” Doss told VOA. He is one of more than 600,000 Americans living without adequate shelter. “I lost my job as a bartender, then my apartment, and things kind of took a turn for the worse from there,” said the 33-year-old African-American native. Doss points to a part of the park where he has seen this tent camp expand in recent months. “We have a lot of veterans, immigrants and minorities living here. I have been here for over a year, ”he said.

Almost 10 in 1,000 DC residents are homeless, twice the national average. Minorities are particularly affected, with blacks, Native Americans and Hispanics being much more likely to be homeless than white Americans.

The homeless live in a Washington, DC park in a tented camp near tourist sites and government buildings. (Chris Simkins / VOA)

“There are huge racial disparities in homelessness and the result of systemic racism in housing and other sectors,” said Sarah Saadian, vice president of public policy at the National Low Income Housing Coalition. “African Americans make up 13% of the American population, but make up about 40% of homeless people and make up more than half of all homeless families.”

Army veteran Edward McCoy has been homeless since 2018. “I want to move into a stable and safe place,” he told VOA. “I’ve been robbed 10 times in this DC park and need help getting out of here.”

Significant government funding, low-rental housing

President Joe Biden’s bailout law, passed by Congress and enacted in March, calls for spending billions of dollars to help the displaced and those at risk of homelessness. Cities and states can use this money to help house people safely during and after the pandemic. The bailout also provides more than $ 46 billion in emergency rental assistance. Non-governmental organizations estimate that between 30 and 40 million people were at risk of losing their homes during the pandemic.

The federal government’s assistance program contains $ 5 billion in emergency housing vouchers for those at risk or experiencing homelessness. “We estimate that these funds could allow us to house at least 150,000 people and create up to 30,000 affordable housing units,” said Nan Roman, president of the National Alliance to End Homelessness. “We will work with the communities to ensure that resources are well targeted and used quickly to get people to find housing.”

Washington city officials are hopeful that people living in homeless settlements will be relocated soon after the old hotel and motel rooms are converted into permanent affordable housing.

“The city will receive $ 19 million in funds from the American Rescue Plan, ‘which is four times what we normally get,” said Washington, DC Mayor Muriel Bowser. “Here in Washington, we’ve been very committed to making homelessness rare, brief and non-recurring.”

Homeless dc
The homeless live in a Washington, DC park in a tented camp near tourist sites and government buildings. (Chris Simkins / VOA)

In Los Angeles, a federal judge is calling for urgent action to find shelter for tens of thousands of homeless people by November. Judge David Carter criticized local authorities for failing to curb the growth of homelessness. “All the rhetoric, promises, plans and budgeting cannot obscure the shameful reality of this crisis,” Carter said in his order. As of January, it was estimated that more than 66,000 people were homeless in Los Angeles County.

Meanwhile, local officials around San Francisco unveiled a plan to reduce homelessness by 75% over the next three years with the construction of more social housing. Experts believe that the lack of social housing is currently one of the main causes of homelessness, a point Saadien insists.

“The private sector cannot build all the necessary housing for homeless people,” she said. “There must be federal grants.



Source link

]]>
https://20thcvetsmem.org/american-communities-unveil-plans-to-fight-homelessness-crisis-voice-of-america/feed/ 0
Veterans’ Corner: Observation of special days in May | New https://20thcvetsmem.org/veterans-corner-observation-of-special-days-in-may-new/ https://20thcvetsmem.org/veterans-corner-observation-of-special-days-in-may-new/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/veterans-corner-observation-of-special-days-in-may-new/ TITUSVILLE – May is Military Helpers and National Military Recognition Month. Here are some important calendar days: • May 1: Silver Star Service Banner Day and Loyalty Day • First Thursday in May: National Day of Prayer • May 7: Military Spouse Appreciation Day • May 8: Victory Day (Victory in Europe on May 8, […]]]>


TITUSVILLE – May is Military Helpers and National Military Recognition Month. Here are some important calendar days:

• May 1: Silver Star Service Banner Day and Loyalty Day

• First Thursday in May: National Day of Prayer

• May 7: Military Spouse Appreciation Day

• May 8: Victory Day (Victory in Europe on May 8, 1945, Germany surrendered unconditionally)

• From May 8 to 16: Week of the armed forces

• May 9: Mother’s Day

• May 13: Children’s Day of Fallen Patriots

• May 15: Armed Forces Day

• May 15: Peace Officers Memorial Day

• May 31: Memorial Day

• • •

Leaders of the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), Disabled American Veterans (DAV) and Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) wrote an editorial calling for comprehensive legislation on exposure to toxic substances.

There are currently several bills that deal with the issue of toxic exposure, and the recommendation of the VFW is to combine all of these bills into a large comprehensive package.

“The time has come for legislation on exposure to toxic substances,” said Hal Roesch, VFW national commander. “Veterans have waited long enough for our elected officials to act on their behalf. If Congress waits for the next conflict to resolve this issue, it is already too late. “

• • •

The VFW announced Thursday that it has partnered with Team Red, White & Blue (Team RWB).

Focused on improving veterans’ access to a combined network of health and wellness, Team RWB provides the camaraderie and support of fellow service members, veterans and their families.

The organization is made up of nearly 200 chapters and communities, made up of over 217,000 members, called Eagles, the majority of whom are post-9/11 veterans.

“Camaraderie, commitment and service are core values ​​for both of our organizations, and together we will be unstoppable in our quest to ensure a better quality of life for every American Veteran,” said Roesch.

• • •

Need help with your US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) claim? The claims process can be confusing and you shouldn’t try to navigate it alone. The VFW’s National Veterans Service is a nationwide network of accredited VA service agents and pre-discharge representatives who are experts in treating VA and are key to your success.

As trained professionals, they help file disability, rehabilitation and education compensation claims; retirement and death benefits; and employment and training programs.

This is a service that VFW is proud to offer free of charge to anyone seeking assistance with the complaints process.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many VFW service desks are operating remotely, and VFW’s network of service agents have the capacity to virtually assist veterans.

The VFW Service Representative for Northwestern Pennsylvania is Julie Hutchison. She can be reached at (814) 835-8494.

• • •

Here’s this week’s POW and Missing in Action update:

• Marine Radioman 3rd Class Theodore Q. Jensen, 22, from Delta, Utah, was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was docked at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor. He will be buried on June 2, 2021 in his hometown.

• 2nd Lieutenant William H. Melville, 20, of Minneapolis, was a pilot assigned to 36th Fighter Squadron, 8th Fighter Group. On October 28, 1943, he was on a combat mission on the island of New Guinea, Australia. Melville will be buried on July 16 in his hometown.

• Army Pfc. Philip T. Hoogacker, 23, was a member of D Company, 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment. He was reported missing in action on July 27, 1950, after his unit was attacked near Anui, South Korea. He died as a prisoner of war. Burial services are on hold.

• 2nd Lieutenant Ernest N. Vienneau, 25, was a pilot assigned to the 340th Bombardment Squadron, 97th Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force, based in Amendola, Italy. On November 6, 1944, the bomber on which he served as co-pilot came under heavy anti-aircraft fire during a mission over Maribor, Yugoslavia. Burial services are on hold.

• Navy Water Tender 1st Class Charles E. Hudson, 39, was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor. Burial services are on hold.

• Leading Seaman Walter C. Stein, 20, was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor. Burial services are on hold.

• Navy Fireman 1st Class Kenneth E. Doernenburg, 23, was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor. Burial services are on hold.

Charlie Castelluccio, a resident of Titusville, is chaplain of the 28th Foreign War Veterans District of Northwestern Pennsylvania and a member of the Titusville Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5958.



Source link

]]>
https://20thcvetsmem.org/veterans-corner-observation-of-special-days-in-may-new/feed/ 0
SeaWorld offers free entry to members of U.S. veterans and their families https://20thcvetsmem.org/seaworld-offers-free-entry-to-members-of-u-s-veterans-and-their-families/ https://20thcvetsmem.org/seaworld-offers-free-entry-to-members-of-u-s-veterans-and-their-families/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 08:47:45 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/seaworld-offers-free-entry-to-members-of-u-s-veterans-and-their-families/ SeaWorld once again shows its gratitude for these men and women who have served in our armed forces with its long-standing Waves of Honor program. From Tuesday, April 27 to June 27, 2021, U.S. Army Veterans and their families can visit SeaWorld Orlando, SeaWorld San Antonio, and SeaWorld San Diego for free. SeaWorld’s Waves of […]]]>


SeaWorld once again shows its gratitude for these men and women who have served in our armed forces with its long-standing Waves of Honor program.

From Tuesday, April 27 to June 27, 2021, U.S. Army Veterans and their families can visit SeaWorld Orlando, SeaWorld San Antonio, and SeaWorld San Diego for free.

SeaWorld’s Waves of Honor program offers former military personnel and up to three guests free one-day admission to SeaWorld Orlando (limit of 4), a sign of the parks’ appreciation for their service to the country.

To take advantage of these offers, click the button to verify your veteran status through ID.me. (Spouses must log in under the veteran’s account in order to take advantage of guest tickets).

For more information on the Waves of Honor Active Duty offer and to take advantage of these offers please click here to go to the official SeaWorld website.

Offer must be used at the park for a visit before June 27, 2021. Blackout dates apply (May 29, 2021). The veteran must be present with his 3 guests.

Additionally, veterans and active military service members can purchase up to six additional tickets at 50% off. Members of the armed services and their direct dependents must have a valid active military identity card to participate. This is part of SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment’s Waves of Honor program, which salutes active duty military personnel, veterans and their families by offering special prices and promotions throughout the year.

“After a difficult year, it is a true privilege to honor the brave men and women who serve and sacrifice so much for our country,” said Marc Swanson, Acting General Manager of SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment. “We are honored to continue this long tradition as a small gesture of the deep gratitude we owe to all who serve and provide their families with the chance to create lasting memories.”



Source link

]]>
https://20thcvetsmem.org/seaworld-offers-free-entry-to-members-of-u-s-veterans-and-their-families/feed/ 0
HOV Surprises Goodyear Veteran With Tribute | New https://20thcvetsmem.org/hov-surprises-goodyear-veteran-with-tribute-new/ https://20thcvetsmem.org/hov-surprises-goodyear-veteran-with-tribute-new/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/hov-surprises-goodyear-veteran-with-tribute-new/ It was an emotional day for veteran Kenneth Hamrick. The staff of The Groves at Goodyear invited their family and friends to a patio party to celebrate their 89th birthday. His care team at Hospice de la Vallée had another surprise in the works: a Salut visit to honor his military service. Hamrick served as […]]]>


It was an emotional day for veteran Kenneth Hamrick.

The staff of The Groves at Goodyear invited their family and friends to a patio party to celebrate their 89th birthday. His care team at Hospice de la Vallée had another surprise in the works: a Salut visit to honor his military service. Hamrick served as an army soldier for two years during the Korean War.

“I loved this special honor,” he said softly. “It took me back to when I enlisted, to 16 weeks of basic training. I was proud to serve.

Hamrick recalled some frightening memories, such as hearing the command, “Fix the bayonets.” His eyes narrow a bit. “It means you are going to fight.” Her most painful memory – losing her cousin to the war. Her favorite memory? “Well my favorite thing was coming home,” he laughs. Then he sobers up. “In one piece,” he added.

After presenting Hamrick with a handmade quilt on a patriotic theme, Army Reservist Ron Garner proudly saluted a man he described as “kind, humble and deserving of such an honor.”

“It just makes my day. It’s really special for me to bond with someone who has served, ”Garner said. “I mean, the man is 89 and wears his veteran hat. His service to our country is obviously important to him.

The visit was also extremely touching for Hamrick’s family, who shared how much they cherished the moment the two men greeted each other.

“It means so much. My dad never talked about the war while I was growing up and probably doesn’t know how much I respect his service. We have our freedom thanks to men like him, ”said his daughter Kim Vancs. “This tribute was touching for me.”

At the Hospice of the Valley, several people worked behind the scenes to make this happen, including Eileen Dullum, a volunteer coordinator; Samantha Inciong, Community Liaison Officer; social worker Katie Cozby; nurse Shannon Seidel; and team leader Sarah Ellis.

Arizona is home to over half a million veterans.

The agency’s Saluting Our Veterans program reflects a commitment to honor veteran patients like Hamrick for their service to the country and for the sacrifices they and their loved ones have made.

Since the program began in 2011, Hospice of the Valley volunteers have made nearly 3,000 tribute visits. These trained volunteers, who are veterans themselves, organize an intimate face-to-face meeting – handing out a ceremonial pin and small flag.

Both veterans spend time remembering their years of service, often surprising family members who are overjoyed to hear stories they have never heard before. These moments are invaluable gifts for Veterans, who relive their past with pride, while families find themselves with new treasured memories.

Greeting visits are a great way to bring comfort, dignity, and compassionate care into a person’s life at a deeply meaningful time. To learn more about how to volunteer for this program or others, visit hov.org/volunteer or call 602-636-6336.



Source link

]]>
https://20thcvetsmem.org/hov-surprises-goodyear-veteran-with-tribute-new/feed/ 0
Veterans push navy to honor black WWII sailor who saved 15 men https://20thcvetsmem.org/veterans-push-navy-to-honor-black-wwii-sailor-who-saved-15-men/ https://20thcvetsmem.org/veterans-push-navy-to-honor-black-wwii-sailor-who-saved-15-men/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 00:54:00 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/veterans-push-navy-to-honor-black-wwii-sailor-who-saved-15-men/

Charles Jackson French rescued 15 other sailors after their ship was sunk by Japanese forces during World War II.

Charles Jackson French rescued 15 other sailors after their ship was sunk by Japanese forces during World War II.

Screenshot from Twitter.

Eight decades after rescuing 15 drifting shipmates and coming under fire in the Pacific Ocean, some veterans are pushing the Navy to recognize Charles Jackson French, a hero they say deserves more recognition than he does. ‘never received any.

French, a black man from Foreman, Arkansas, worked as a messenger on a transport destroyer called USS Gregory, according to a 1943 Associated Press article. When bombs sank the Gregory near the Solomon Islands in a battle with Japanese forces on September 5, 1942, the French were fortunate enough to do so aboard a lifeboat. But neither he nor his fellow sailors were safe, just a smaller target than before.

“After the engagement, a group of about 15 men was adrift on a raft that was being deliberately bombed by Japanese naval forces,” Admiral William Halsey Jr. told The Associated Press.

To keep the men safe, French tied one end of a rope to the raft and the other around his waist, jumped into the shark-infested waters and swam for hours without stopping.

“His conduct was in accordance with the highest traditions of naval service,” said Halsey.

The French received a commendation and “became known nationally as the ‘human tug’,” Military.com reported. His face has been put on War Gum trading cards, and he’s appeared in syndicated comics, the Washington Informer reported, and the Black newspaper the Chicago Defender dubbed him Hero of the Year.

French’s story recently resurfaced thanks to a Twitter message retweeted by Navy veteran and author Malcolm Nance on Saturday, with Nance wondering why French was not considered for higher praise.

“BLACK MARINE OF WWII JUST GETS NAVY CORPS MEDAL TO SAVE 15 MEN AFTER SUNK IN COMBAT ACTION !?” Nance wrote, marking several official Navy accounts.

the Chief of Naval Information, Rear Adm. Charlie Brown responded the next day.

“Thank you for bringing this heroic story to light, Senior,” Brown tweeted, promising to speak with Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Michael Gilday to “see if we can do more to recognize the French Chief Petty Officer.

Several veterans told Newsweek it was no surprise that a black sailor like the French didn’t get the recognition he deserved.

“Too often in our past, military personnel of color were overlooked despite their loyalty and bravery in the face of overwhelming obstacles,” said Naveed Shah, a US Army veteran.

Lt. Cmdr. Ernest Morales III believes that French deserves the Medal of Honor, the highest American military honor: “There is no time like the present to correct the errors of yesterday’s thoughts. French executed gallantly on September 5, 1942 in defiance of his own personal safety to help save the lives of 15 wounded comrades.

In 1956, French died in San Diego at the age of 37, media reports.

He struggled with alcoholism as he aged, and his memories of war weighed heavily on him, author Chester Wright wrote in his book “Black Men and Blue Water,” Military.com reported.

“After interviewing friends up close, it would appear that he came back from the Pacific War ‘stressed’ that he had seen too much death and destruction,” Wright wrote.

Similar Stories From Miami Herald

Mitchell Willetts is a real-time reporter covering the Carolinas for McClatchy. He is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma and is passionate about the outdoors.





Source link

]]>
https://20thcvetsmem.org/veterans-push-navy-to-honor-black-wwii-sailor-who-saved-15-men/feed/ 0
Quilts of Valor distributed to two local veterans https://20thcvetsmem.org/quilts-of-valor-distributed-to-two-local-veterans/ https://20thcvetsmem.org/quilts-of-valor-distributed-to-two-local-veterans/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 00:26:11 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/quilts-of-valor-distributed-to-two-local-veterans/ April 27 – Two Vietnam Veterans, Private 1st Class Gary Romanski (retired) and Sgt. 1st Class Archie Carpenter (retired), received Valor Quilts Friday in honor of their time in the military. Carpenter, who joined the Army in 1957, served in Vietnam from 1967 to 1968. He was then posted to Fort Riley before being deployed […]]]>


April 27 – Two Vietnam Veterans, Private 1st Class Gary Romanski (retired) and Sgt. 1st Class Archie Carpenter (retired), received Valor Quilts Friday in honor of their time in the military.

Carpenter, who joined the Army in 1957, served in Vietnam from 1967 to 1968. He was then posted to Fort Riley before being deployed to Korea. In 1978 he would be stationed at Fort Riley once again before deciding to retire at Junction City. He traveled throughout the United States and beyond during his career before settling in Junction City. Carpenter was in the military for 21 years before retiring.

Romanski was drafted into the military in 1968. He did his basic training partly at Fort Riley before being deployed to Vietnam. He was injured in 1969 by a rocket-propelled grenade shrapnel. The same day he was injured by the grenade shrapnel, Romanski was shot in the chest. Despite his injuries, he continued to fight. Romanski was injured a second time after sustaining a serious head injury. He had to be transported to the 95th Medevac Hospital, located in Da Nang before being transferred to Camp Zama in Japan. He would later be returned to the United States where he was honorably released.

Quilts of Valor is a project to distribute handmade quilts to veterans in recognition of their time in the military.

Donna Martinson of the Central Flint Hills Quilts of Valor Project said Quilts of Valor was created in honor of the 40th anniversary of the Vietnam War.

“We knew that our Vietnam vets had not been thanked appropriately for their service and we also learned that many of our Korean War vets were not thanked for their service,” he said. she declared.

The quilts are intended as a thank you for their time with the military and to offer comfort and warmth to veterans who may or may not have had enough in their lives according to the estimates of those who make the quilts.

A veteran receives only one Valor Quilt in his life.



Source link

]]>
https://20thcvetsmem.org/quilts-of-valor-distributed-to-two-local-veterans/feed/ 0
Injured Veterans Honor Injured Police Officer | Local News https://20thcvetsmem.org/injured-veterans-honor-injured-police-officer-local-news/ https://20thcvetsmem.org/injured-veterans-honor-injured-police-officer-local-news/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 00:04:00 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/injured-veterans-honor-injured-police-officer-local-news/ Army veterans who were wounded in action came to Waseca on Tuesday to honor a policeman who was also injured in the line of duty. “Officer Matson’s service and sacrifice for Waseca and our community at large is inspiring,” Greg Moon said outside the Waseca County courthouse on Tuesday evening. Moon and other military order […]]]>


Army veterans who were wounded in action came to Waseca on Tuesday to honor a policeman who was also injured in the line of duty.

“Officer Matson’s service and sacrifice for Waseca and our community at large is inspiring,” Greg Moon said outside the Waseca County courthouse on Tuesday evening.

Moon and other military order officers from Minnesota’s Purple Heart Department thanked Waseca police officer Arik Matson, who was shot in the head in January 2020 by a wanted suspect.

“It’s hard for most of us to know how officers respond to these calls, day after day and night after night,” Moon said. “But we want you to know that we commend you for doing it. We cannot express how much we respect and admire Arik, his family and the Waseca community.






The Minnesota chapter of the Military Order of the Purple Heart, David Bellis, speaks with Waseca Police Officer Arik Matson after presenting him with the national recognition of the organization’s first responders on Tuesday.



The Military Order of the Purple Heart Department is a veterans service organization made up of veterans who have received a Purple Heart for injuries sustained in combat. The organization also grants national first responder recognition to police and other first responders who are injured or killed in the line of duty.

“Our first responder program is an effort on our part to recognize the work, bravery and sacrifice of the men and women of law enforcement, fire and emergency services,” Moon said. .

Honor guards from Waseca VFW and Legion posts also helped honor Matson, as did attendees who included members of his family, colleagues from the Waseca Police Department, Waseca Town officials and other supporters.






Matson Prize 3

A colored guard prepares for a ceremony honoring Waseca Police Officer Arik Matson on Tuesday at the Waseca County Veterans Memorial outside the Waseca County Courthouse.



After the brief ceremony, some of the Matson and supporters headed to another reunion to help plan a benefit for the Matson family on May 22 at the Waseca County Fairgrounds. Led by Waseca’s Sweet-Sommers VFW Post 1642 and Ray Rew of Triple R Auctioneering, the volunteers are relaunching their plans for a profit that Rew originally said was planned for March 2020 before the pandemic forced its postponement.

Permanent pandemic restrictions could limit the number allowed through the gates of the fairgrounds, but Rew said he and other organizers hoped the restrictions on outdoor events would be lifted before May 22.

Planned activities include live music, a car show, bingo, live and silent auctions, bake sale, food vendors, beer garden and fireworks. . The Matson family will be present for an opening ceremony at 10:30 a.m. and deliver a speech at 6:30 p.m.

Free will donations will be accepted at the door. All of these donations along with the auction and other profits will go to the Matson family, Rew said.

Arik continues physical therapy and still has severe side effects from his brain injury. But he’s gradually resuming daily activities like going to the grocery store, according to posts on his wife Megan Matson’s Instagram page.

Last weekend, the family took their first mini-vacation to a water park. Megan admitted that she was worried in advance and that it was emotionally difficult to see other healthy and carefree families.

But she concluded, “Although life seems very different to us now. I look at my family and smile, take a deep breath, and find the positive in every situation to get me through my grieving moments. I’m grateful that we still have Arik with us to make memories. “





Source link

]]>
https://20thcvetsmem.org/injured-veterans-honor-injured-police-officer-local-news/feed/ 0
Pandemic added to food insecurity among military families https://20thcvetsmem.org/pandemic-added-to-food-insecurity-among-military-families/ https://20thcvetsmem.org/pandemic-added-to-food-insecurity-among-military-families/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 00:00:00 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/pandemic-added-to-food-insecurity-among-military-families/ On a recent spring day at Fort Sam Houston, a line of idling cars with their trunks opened, waiting for volunteers to unload 11,000 pounds of food into a nearby parking lot. Some of the drivers were soldiers who had just left work, while others were spouses or relatives of soldiers. As they walked forward […]]]>


On a recent spring day at Fort Sam Houston, a line of idling cars with their trunks opened, waiting for volunteers to unload 11,000 pounds of food into a nearby parking lot. Some of the drivers were soldiers who had just left work, while others were spouses or relatives of soldiers.

As they walked forward to collect their rations, most barely cracked their windows – volunteers say this is common because people don’t want to be seen.

“After they register, we assess where they are,” said Dr Patricia Ruiz, director of the Vogel Resiliency Center, which organizes these monthly food distributions in partnership with the San Antonio Food Bank.

“Sometimes ‘things don’t go so well’, and there are all these kids screaming behind their backs. Some will just say, you know, “It’s been a really tough month.” Some will tell these stories, like “We had four members of our family. Now it’s up to 10. ”Because they are second generation families. Everyone has been hit so hard by the pandemic.

One of the volunteers distributing food was the Army Sgt. Rebecca Hummer, a respiratory therapist who is still recovering from a difficult period caused by the pandemic. Although she earns just over $ 60,000 a year – including housing and food allowances – Hummer still felt the effects when her husband Dale lost his job as a security guard in November.

“He was looking to get hired,” she said. “But because of the pandemic, there were layoffs, so he couldn’t find work immediately. We were faced with financial difficulties. “

On top of that, the couple had two huge unforeseen expenses. Their house was flooded after a heavy rain, causing thousands of dollars in damage, and their dog was diagnosed with cancer. The bills started to pile up.

“It was tough,” Hummer said. “My husband and I are saving money. But we had to cut back on what we normally get at the grocery store, in terms of the choice of boxed items and a lot less fresh produce. We were picking up things that were perhaps less nutritious to get by. But that’s what we did. And I’m not proud to say it, but I skipped meals.

Hummer was reluctant to tell others about the hardships she was facing – and postponed seeking food aid for as long as possible.

Carson Frame / Texas Public Radio

Cars wait for rations at a food distribution event for families affiliated with the military.

“In the military, we say that perception is reality,” she said. “So if you ask for help, there might be this perception that you are weak. For me, it was a combination of the need to be considered competent – and then it’s also that I’m just a very private person in general.

The couple are now recovering financially, but have had to rely on food assistance to get by. They are not alone. Over the past year, COVID-19 has exacerbated unique challenges for military families, such as high spousal unemployment rates. According to a investigation from military support organization Blue Star Families, more than 40% of working military spouses reported losing their jobs during the height of the pandemic. Others had to reduce their working hours, usually to take care of children who were at home and in virtual school.

Many still haven’t returned to full-time work.

“We have seen a lot more job losses among military spouses, because child care has become an issue,” said Christine Abraham, director of culinary wellness at the resilience center.

Poorly enlisted families have been particularly affected by food insecurity during the pandemic, their risk increasing if they have multiple dependents or a sick family member. Staff at the Vogel Resilience Center regularly respond to requests from military families looking for ways to split every dollar of their income and get meals on the table.

“For the enlisted soldiers – to keep them from food insecurity – that second income is what made the big difference,” Abraham added.

COVID-19 has also disrupted many services that normally help military families transition from place to place. Some had to incur costs if their relocation plans were affected by the pandemic. There were also delays in processing new housing and payroll formalities, among other things.

In 2015, research showed that one in seven enlisted families at Joint Base San Antonio were food insecure. Abraham estimates he is now closer to three out of seven.

It is difficult to assess how difficult it is for current members of the service to put food on the table. Much of the reporting from food banks and pantries is anecdotal, as these agencies typically do not ask questions about military status.

“These agencies are really trying to protect the anonymity and dignity of those they serve,” said Josh Protas, vice president of public policy for MAZON, A Jewish Response to Hunger.

Nonetheless, MAZON has heard testimony from across the country that more military families are using emergency food aid because of COVID-19. (The organization published a report in April, detailing the problem and its contributing factors.) Census Bureau surveys also showed increased rates of spousal unemployment and economic hardship.

“I’m not sure we have an exact statistic on food insecurity, but we know it’s on the increase,” Protas added.

The San Antonio Food Bank estimates that 37% of all households it served during the pandemic have a current or former military. This is up from 15% before the coronavirus pandemic. In total, around 45,000 people with military ties have faced food insecurity since spring 2020.

The Defense Ministry is aware of figures from outside groups that show food insecurity has increased during the pandemic, but it does not have reliable figures.

“The Department is concerned about reports that military families may increasingly rely on food banks and pantries to put food on the table,” Pentagon spokeswoman Lisa Lawrence said. , in an email. “While official DoD survey data shows that food bank dependence among military families is relatively low, we also understand that this may not capture the full effect of COVID-19 on the issue. . “

She added that the ministry plans to collect food insecure-specific data through surveys of active duty spouses.

This story was produced by the American Homefront Project, a public media collaboration that reports on American military life and veterans. Funding comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.



Source link

]]>
https://20thcvetsmem.org/pandemic-added-to-food-insecurity-among-military-families/feed/ 0
Middlesex Community College names military-friendly school https://20thcvetsmem.org/middlesex-community-college-names-military-friendly-school/ https://20thcvetsmem.org/middlesex-community-college-names-military-friendly-school/#respond Tue, 27 Apr 2021 23:59:40 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/middlesex-community-college-names-military-friendly-school/ Middlesex Community College has been named a 2021 Silver Level Military Friendly School by VIQTORY. The CMC supports veterans and their families through Veterans Resource Centers, a Veterans Advisory Council and other special veterans services. “I am so proud that Middlesex has been given the honor of being a Friendly Designated Military College,” said Pamela […]]]>


Middlesex Community College has been named a 2021 Silver Level Military Friendly School by VIQTORY.

The CMC supports veterans and their families through Veterans Resource Centers, a Veterans Advisory Council and other special veterans services.

“I am so proud that Middlesex has been given the honor of being a Friendly Designated Military College,” said Pamela Flaherty, MCC’s Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students. “We started from very humble beginnings in 2006 with a volunteer student. We have become two comprehensive HRV centers, providing a range of services to our veterans and military-related families. “

The annual Military-Friendly Schools List honors the nation’s top colleges, universities, and vocational schools. They are known to go out of their way to welcome military service members, veterans and spouses of the United States as students and to ensure their success – in the classroom and after graduation.

Middlesex provides training opportunities – as well as many resources for veterans – to ease the transition from military to civilian life.

Nicole Smay, an MCC senior nurse who is a combat veteran, served as an Army Medical Service officer and walked away with the rank of captain.

Grateful for MCC’s help in navigating its VA benefits, Smay calls MCC academic advisor Melinda Turchiano her “safety net” in helping her use her post-9/11 GI bill.

Smay also believes that her experience in the military helped her prepare for her studies, including understanding the importance of “watching over your boyfriend”. To succeed in her studies, she relies on the support of her classmates and teachers, and tries to do the same for them.

“I firmly believe that the military prepared me for rigorous training as a nursing student,” Smay said. “A nursing student needs to be strong willed, focused, and able to internalize emotions and think critically while providing patient care. The military taught me how to do this as an officer, and the professors in the nursing program worked to refine these qualities.

For more information on Veterans Services in Middlesex, contact Jessica A. Frost, Director of the VRC, at frostj@middlesex.mass.edu or 978-656-3282, or visit www.middlesex.mass.edu/veteransresources .



Source link

]]>
https://20thcvetsmem.org/middlesex-community-college-names-military-friendly-school/feed/ 0