Veterans Memorial – 20th CVETSMEM http://20thcvetsmem.org/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 16:49:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://20thcvetsmem.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1.png Veterans Memorial – 20th CVETSMEM http://20thcvetsmem.org/ 32 32 The ultimate sacrifice means nothing | The Spokesperson’s Review https://20thcvetsmem.org/the-ultimate-sacrifice-means-nothing-the-spokespersons-review/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 16:49:32 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/the-ultimate-sacrifice-means-nothing-the-spokespersons-review/ It will be a sad day for veterans when Spokane School District 81 (Spokane Public Schools) tears down a monument to Washington State and local veterans. Now known as Joe Albi Stadium, the original name in 1950 was Spokane Memorial Stadium. The stadium was built as a memorial to our fallen heroes who made the […]]]>

It will be a sad day for veterans when Spokane School District 81 (Spokane Public Schools) tears down a monument to Washington State and local veterans.

Now known as Joe Albi Stadium, the original name in 1950 was Spokane Memorial Stadium. The stadium was built as a memorial to our fallen heroes who made the ultimate sacrifice, for our freedom. Two monument markers still stand proudly reading: ‘HONORING THOSE IN THIS STATE WHO DIED FOR THEIR COUNTRY’.

In 1948, Citizens of 1949 and 1950 raised $600,000 to build the stadium. “They were delighted to present it as a gift to the city, free and clear, as a memorial to the sons of our city who gave their lives, in their country’s wars.” The stadium was to be a lasting and useful monument (September 10, 1950, The Spokesman-Review).

Spokane Mayor Arthur R. Meehan; W. Otto Warn, President of the Chamber of Commerce; and Clifford E. Lucas, Chairman of the Spokane School Board, all agreed at a City Council meeting that the stadium should be a “permanent memorial to our war heroes” (July 14, 1950, Spokane Daily Chronicle).

More information can be found in the Veterans Memorial Preservation and Recognition Act 2003.

Please help me, my local, state and national leaders won’t!

Craig Gerlack

Spokane

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COVID-19 outbreak declared at Veterans Memorial Lodge nursing home in Saanich https://20thcvetsmem.org/covid-19-outbreak-declared-at-veterans-memorial-lodge-nursing-home-in-saanich/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 00:44:50 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/covid-19-outbreak-declared-at-veterans-memorial-lodge-nursing-home-in-saanich/ Broadmead Care declares an outbreak of COVID-19 at the Veterans Memorial Lodge nursing home. The company says three residents have tested positive for the virus, one in unit A2, two in B3. Broadmead Care’s medical director has outbreak prevention measures in place in the care home, which follow Island Health’s outbreak protocols. Residents who have […]]]>

Broadmead Care declares an outbreak of COVID-19 at the Veterans Memorial Lodge nursing home.

The company says three residents have tested positive for the virus, one in unit A2, two in B3.

Broadmead Care’s medical director has outbreak prevention measures in place in the care home, which follow Island Health’s outbreak protocols.

Residents who have tested positive are being isolated in their rooms, and affected residents and staff are being monitored twice a day for symptoms.

There will be no communal meals and social visits have been suspended. Essential visits will continue.

Affected rooms will be subject to enhanced cleaning and infection control measures and staff movement will be restricted where possible.

Broadmead Care says it is in contact with Island Health about this outbreak.

The company says all families of affected residents have been contacted, and if someone has not been contacted, their loved one is unaffected by this outbreak.

Island Health has not yet listed this outbreak on its website, and there are currently 12 other health care outbreaks in the health authority area.

READ MORE: Island Health declares five new outbreaks of COVID-19

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Obituary: Scott Robert Horne – CentralMaine.com https://20thcvetsmem.org/obituary-scott-robert-horne-centralmaine-com/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 06:01:01 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/obituary-scott-robert-horne-centralmaine-com/ Robert Horne BENTON — On January 3, 2022, Scott Horne, 55, spent a beautiful, uneventful day at his beloved Benton home with the love of his life. Late that evening, Scott died unexpectedly in the great outdoors of Maine, which had been such an important part of his life. Scott has resided his entire life […]]]>

Robert Horne

BENTON — On January 3, 2022, Scott Horne, 55, spent a beautiful, uneventful day at his beloved Benton home with the love of his life. Late that evening, Scott died unexpectedly in the great outdoors of Maine, which had been such an important part of his life. Scott has resided his entire life in the Fairfield Benton area. He was the son of Ted and Stephanie Danforth (predeceased). He attended Lawrence High School before joining the military. He served honorably in the army, completed jumping school and received the status of an expert in hand grenades. No surprise to those who knew Scott. Scott was a lifelong adventurer, living every moment on his terms. For many, he was “Superman”. Intrepid and larger than life. He was an avid hunter, member of the Big Bucks Club. He was proud of his venison recipes and could be found baking batches of cookies for everyone. He was at home on the ocean, lobster fishing as well as fishing and catching bait on several Maine lakes, ponds and rivers. He was equally at home on snowmobiles as he was on four-wheeled trails. I loved riding his Harley. Gardening was a passion for Scott. Scott was generous to the end, both of himself and of what he had. For those who called him friend or family, he was never too busy to do what he could when needed. Scott naturally loved animals. Anyone living with Scott knew they would have to share their living space with animals. including, but not limited to, snakes, turtles, ferrets, lizards and his devoted “pack of rats”. Scott also loved children. He was a larger than life grandfather to Violet Rose and Hunter Scott. He was known to give young anglers free bait from his shop. He liked to see young people outside enjoying the ice cream, the woods and the garden. No one who had seen Scott in his full Easter Bunny outfit riding side-by-side through Benton, could ever doubt that there was not yet a big kid residing in his big heart. His bright blue eyes were always shining and even in the worst of times he could find a smile and a hug to share. At the age of 14, Scott joined the Kent family farm in Benton. He remained there until he joined the army. After his military service he returned to Benton, staying with his godparents Buddy and Nancy Dow (predeceased). Buddy and Nancy remained an important part of Scott’s life until their passing. Scott then worked at several locations including PB Guide Services, Northern Mattress and local factories. Twenty-two years ago, he started his own bait business in Oakland known as “Wild Things.” He was highly respected and sought after in the bait trade. He was helped in his business by his family, as well as by his friend Jamie Moore. He was often known to have gone on adventures with his frequent partner in crime Will Daggett Jr. the tractor with the one he loved. Besides his parents and godparents, Scott, was predeceased by his wife Kathy Marie Horne. He is survived by two children; daughter Dawn Horne and partner Jason Stowe and son Kenneth Violette and partner Sunshine White; two grandchildren Violet Rose and Hunter Scott; his three sisters, Lucretia Raymond, Laurie Burkett and Michelle Ring, his aunts and uncles Darlene Rodgers, Dan and Melanie Good, and Vincent Morrison, Larry and Kathy Horne, Ken and Rona Horne, as well as numerous cousins, nieces and nephews. Celebration of Life will be held Saturday, February 5 at 1 p.m. at the Best Western Hotel, Main St. Waterville, in the O’Brien Banquet Hall (formerly known as Pete and Larry). The family asks you to come with your Scott stories for one last adventure with the one and only Scott. There will be a full military burial at the Maine Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Augusta. A date will be forthcoming. Additionally, a memorial event in Scott’s honor will be held to benefit children and the outdoors. Look for details on Facebook in the near future.

Golden Book

” Previous

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Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Events 2022 MLK Fresno CA https://20thcvetsmem.org/martin-luther-king-jr-celebration-events-2022-mlk-fresno-ca/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/martin-luther-king-jr-celebration-events-2022-mlk-fresno-ca/ The 38th annual events to honor and commemorate slain civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. begin Friday in Fresno and take place both online and in person. Last year’s events were only online due to COVID-19 issues. This year, the commemoration of Dr. King’s birthday will begin with a wreath opening ceremony on […]]]>

The 38th annual events to honor and commemorate slain civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. begin Friday in Fresno and take place both online and in person.

Last year’s events were only online due to COVID-19 issues. This year, the commemoration of Dr. King’s birthday will begin with a wreath opening ceremony on Friday and continue with many events throughout the week.

FRESNO MLK UNIT COMMITTEE EVENTS

Most MLK Unity Committee events can be accessed through a Zoom link and the same Zoom ID: 870 4811 5825.

People can also access the events through the Fresno Martin Luther King Unity Committee Facebook page and the City of Fresno Facebook page.

Friday January 14

11:45 a.m.. Garland Opening Ceremony at Fresno County Courthouse Park (at the MLK Memorial Bust, on the west side of the park facing Van Ness Avenue). Welcome by City Council President Nelson Esparza, Council Member Miguel Arias. Remarks from Fresno County Schools Superintendent Jim Yovino. Featuring Mayor Jerry Dyer as a special guest speaker.

6 p.m. Awards Ceremony and Community Reception at Fresno City Hall.

Saturday January 15

9am Virtual: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s celebratory program can be viewed on the Clovis Police Department’s Facebook page @ClovisPoliceDepartmentCalifornia.

6 p.m. MLK Candlelight Peace Vigil at Fresno City Hall. Candles will be provided.

Monday January 17

9:15 a.m. MLK Community March from St. John’s Cathedral, 2814 Mariposa Street. Walkers gather at 9:30 a.m. The march starts at 10 a.m., stops at City Hall, then heads to the Veterans Memorial Auditorium.

11 a.m. Virtual: Commemoration program on the Martin Luther King Unity Committee Facebook page and the City of Fresno Facebook page.

Other Fresno MLK Events

Thursday, January 13, noon: Virtual: West Fresno Ministerial Alliance Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration presented by the Moving Unity Forward Committee.

Thursday, January 13, 1 p.m.: Virtual: Fresno County Student MLK Speech Contest.

Sunday, January 16, 3 p.m.: MLK Thematic Exploration Program, “Relive the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Experience!” Fresno Martin Luther King Unity Committee Facebook page and City of Fresno Facebook page and Zoom (ID: 870 4811 5825).

Friday, January 21, noon: Dr. King Memorial, Fresno State Peace Garden on Maple Avenue.

Madera MLK Event

Monday, January 17, 10 a.m.: Madera Coalition for Community Justice Celebration of Martin Luther King Day in Madera with community representatives.

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Times-Union name removed from performing arts center https://20thcvetsmem.org/times-union-name-removed-from-performing-arts-center/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 17:17:00 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/times-union-name-removed-from-performing-arts-center/ The Times-Union name faded from the Jacksonville Performing Arts Center after nearly three decades. The city-owned concert hall is abandoning the Times-Union name and will be known as the Jacksonville Performing Arts Center until the city finds a new sponsor, Brian Hughes, the city’s executive director, said on Tuesday. The Florida Times-Union bought the naming […]]]>

The Times-Union name faded from the Jacksonville Performing Arts Center after nearly three decades.

The city-owned concert hall is abandoning the Times-Union name and will be known as the Jacksonville Performing Arts Center until the city finds a new sponsor, Brian Hughes, the city’s executive director, said on Tuesday.

The Florida Times-Union bought the naming rights in 1994 for $ 3 million, when it was owned by Morris Communications. The deal did not involve annual payments like current naming contracts usually do.

Gatehouse Media, a division of New Media Investment Group, bought The Times-Union in 2017, and Gatehouse bought Gannett Co. – the country’s largest newspaper publisher – in 2019, retaining the Gannett name.

The city approached the new owners about the naming rights for the performing arts center, but they were focused on running their newspaper and were not interested, Hughes said.

“There’s no scenario where a naming right is a one-time payment in perpetuity; that’s just not the way naming rights are structured, certainly not in the modern age,” said Hughes. The goal would be to have a similar contract at the VyStar Veterans Memorial Arena, a 15-year deal in which VyStar Credit Union annually pays the city to keep its name on the site.

The Times-Union sign was taken down on Wednesday, although the centre’s promotional material, tickets and website still retain the old name.

“The Performing Arts Center has recurring needs every year, and as the structures age some of them become important, said Hughes. “As the building ages, things need to be fixed. They can either be postponed if they are not serious or be taken care of by the taxpayers.”

According to Hughes, the idea of ​​removing the name began last year in discussions with the centre’s main tenant, the Jacksonville Symphony, and the city’s management company for places like the Performing Arts Center and TIAA Bank Field. , ASM Global.

ASM identified skyrocketing costs associated with the center as the city budgeted for fiscal year 2021-2022 around January of last year.

Hughes said the management group will be tasked with finding and securing a new sponsor for the building, with the hope that the process will be far enough along for city council to vote on a contract before approving a new budget. in autumn.

The centre’s three halls, a theater, a concert hall, and a recital hall, are mainly rented out by the symphony orchestra, its youth orchestra, and Florida State College in Jacksonville.

The Jacksonville Symphony did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

“We look forward to working with the people from the symphony orchestra, other stakeholders, city council,” said Hughes. “The formal push, when there is one, is to ensure that it is a naming rights partner who shares the purpose and values ​​of the Performing Arts Center and potentially has an existing relationship with the symphony orchestra and other artistic organizations.

Heather Schatz contributed to this report.

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The orthopedic institute celebrates its 10th anniversary https://20thcvetsmem.org/the-orthopedic-institute-celebrates-its-10th-anniversary/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 19:15:36 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/the-orthopedic-institute-celebrates-its-10th-anniversary/ As the Orthopedic Institute (OI) celebrates its 10th anniversary this year, patients in need of orthopedic care can continue to enjoy this facility which offers outpatient and inpatient care in one place, making it easy and easy to obtain the care they need. The Orthopedic Institute, located at 27 Southern Pointe Parkway on Veterans Memorial […]]]>

As the Orthopedic Institute (OI) celebrates its 10th anniversary this year, patients in need of orthopedic care can continue to enjoy this facility which offers outpatient and inpatient care in one place, making it easy and easy to obtain the care they need.

The Orthopedic Institute, located at 27 Southern Pointe Parkway on Veterans Memorial Drive in Hattiesburg, has 30 beds. As the only stand-alone orthopedic hospital in the region, the services offered are of a standard of care unmatched in southern Mississippi.

“Forrest General continues to lead this region with constant advancements in facilities and technology while providing comfort and convenience to our patients, said Steve Jackson, Administrator of OI. “The Orthopedic Institute continues to be a valuable asset to Hattiesburg, the State and the Southeast when it comes to providing exceptional orthopedic care. ”

For many orthopedic patients requiring joint replacement, such as a hip, knee, or shoulder, or surgery on the hand, foot, ankle, spine, or sports injury, OI is a one-stop-shop. Patients of the Orthopedic Institute have the opportunity to recover in a facility equipped to specifically care for orthopedic patients and their unique needs. The Orthopedic Institute offers services that correspond to the highest standards of orthopedic care provided across the country.

Patients are cared for in specially designed rooms with larger doors, larger bathrooms, and assistive devices to meet the unique needs of an orthopedic patient. The people working in the hospital are trained to focus on orthopedic patients and their particular problems, and their special skills and knowledge lead to high quality care. This translates into increased safety, faster recoveries and increased patient satisfaction.

The Institute covers more than 74,000 square feet and also includes orthopedic operating rooms, preoperative and recovery rooms, as well as support services such as physiotherapy and laboratory and diagnostic imaging services. In addition to the custom-designed patient rooms, other areas of the facility are customized to optimize patient care, including the 10-bed Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) and six operating theaters. 625 square feet. Each of these areas offers state-of-the-art equipment and technologies.

“We are committed to advancing the quality of orthopedic health care in our region,” said Jackson. “This facility will continue to provide a personalized, patient-centered environment and strengthen Hattiesburg’s reputation as a regional reference center for orthopedics and other medical specialties.”

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Youngstown man uses love of history to honor veterans | News, Sports, Jobs https://20thcvetsmem.org/youngstown-man-uses-love-of-history-to-honor-veterans-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 05:06:58 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/youngstown-man-uses-love-of-history-to-honor-veterans-news-sports-jobs/ Staff File Photo / Bob Coupland Steffon Jones of Youngstown, center, 59, has always had a love of history and uses that passion to mark veterans’ graves at cemeteries across the region, primarily at the cemetery of ‘Oak Hill in Youngstown. YOUNGSTOWN – Steffon Jones knew from a young age that history would become his […]]]>

Staff File Photo / Bob Coupland Steffon Jones of Youngstown, center, 59, has always had a love of history and uses that passion to mark veterans’ graves at cemeteries across the region, primarily at the cemetery of ‘Oak Hill in Youngstown.

YOUNGSTOWN – Steffon Jones knew from a young age that history would become his lifelong passion.

Jones recalls that his mother, Joyce Love, was practically the historian of the family. When her family members told stories from their past, she wrote it all down on a piece of paper. This led to his passion for recording and preserving the graves of unrecognized veterans and black veterans buried in local cemeteries in the Mahoning Valley to ensure their heirlooms are brought to the fore.

“My mother was very young when she started writing the stories of her loved ones on sheets of paper and she did so before the age of 12. My mother continued this tradition into adulthood. When I was a child, she taught me to do research and taught me how to index information. This is how I entered history. I remember when I was 12 my grandfather, Isaac Williams, also talked a lot about history, and he touched me by the sleeve of my shirt and said, ‘You have to learn history. ‘”Jones said.

LOVE OF HISTORY

Jones, a longtime resident of Youngstown, was born at Northside Hospital in 1962. He attended Campbell, Youngstown and Struthers schools and remembers how much he loved his history lessons. He attended Youngstown State University for college, where he studied history. His mother told him he should have become a history teacher.

Jones’ father, George “Wydell” Jones was the singer and songwriter of the famous Campbell-based doo-wop group, The Edsels. George “Wydell” Jones wrote the group’s national hit in 1958, “Rama Lama Ding Dong”. Jones said his father also served in the US Air Force from 1954 to 1957.

Jones is now a part and founding member of the Broadhead and Wydell Memorial Team, which documents, records, identifies, preserves and replaces the gravestones of forgotten veterans in the area. His passion began at Oak Hill Cemetery in Youngstown in 1995. Jones said that over the years the Broadhead and Wydell Memorial team have maintained the tradition of placing flags at the graves of veterans at the Cemetery of ‘Oak Hill.

“The name ‘Wydell’ was my dad’s stage name when he was on The Edsels, so I wanted to include it in the team name. My father also loved history. The team is also named after Bill Broadhead, a former resident of Youngstown and my partner in the Oak Hill Cemetery Search Team. Broadhead’s father served in WWII in the Battle of the Bulge. Over the years Broadhead and I have recorded graves at various local cemeteries such as Belmont Cemetery, but our primary focus has been on Oak Hill Cemetery, ”Jones said.

The registration, search and identification of historic graves is a precise process. For Jones, the research is worth his time and hard work. He said you have to go to the cemetery first and look at each grave section by section and row by row. Jones said you write all the names on the gravestones. He also said that you have to be careful with some graves because the markers are different for different wars.

“Flag bearers on graves will help you locate them. Gravestones are different for different wars. For example, all stones from WWII are flat stones that are in the ground. The tombstones from the Civil War, the Mexican-American War, and the First World War are white granite and they stand upright. With Civil War Headstones, Union Army Headstones are straight, but round on top, while Confederate Army Headstones have a spike on top. When you see a GA R. insignia on a stone, which represents the Grand Army of the Republic (a fraternal organization of Union Army veterans who served during the Civil War). Then there are different monuments with statues of soldiers on them. Oak Hill Cemetery has a handsome World War I veteran, the body Claude M. Dey, who was killed in France during the war, ”Jones said.

CIVIL WAR STONES

Jones said that in identifying the headstones of Civil War veterans, there was a big difference between the letters on the headstones. These complex distinctions are key identification tools in the research process. At first, when Jones started recording Veterans’ graves, he only recorded Civil War graves. He recorded approximately 30 black Civil War veterans at Oak Hill Cemetery.

“For a white soldier, they’ll have a regiment on it. For a black American Union soldier, the stone will bear the initials of the USCT (United States Colored Troops). Other initials on the black tombstones of American Union soldiers include the USCC (United States Colored Cavalry), USCI (United States Colored Infantry), USCHA (United States Colored Heavy Artillery) and the USCLA (United States Colored Light Artillery), ”Jones said.

Jones said the Broadhead and Wydell Memorial team has its own tombstone research team. He said the team also has its own field team which is involved in surveying. The research team and the field team work side by side.

“We gave our first partial list to the Tod’s Homestead Cemetery Association in Youngstown. It was a list of veterans who did not have flag bearers on their tombstones. Our search team found a WWII soldier who fought for Canada who never had a standard bearer on his stone. Another interesting find was a soldier with a private tombstone and our team discovered he was a Civil War veteran. In addition, on the back of veterans’ tombstones there are bronze markers. Our team like to call these bronze markers “BBs”, which means “bronze back”. There are also veteran tombstones with a small bronze marker in the shape of a soccer ball and these can be found on the front of the stones. On the other hand, some tombstones bear bronze plaques. When our team trains people, we teach them all of these things so they can identify tombstones, ”Jones said.

WORLD WAR I PROJECT

Jones said the goal of the Broadhead and Wydell Memorial Team is to secure flag bearers for the graves of veterans who do not have them.

“With God’s help, our team are going out there to make sure these soldiers have flags and flag bearers on their headstones. Also, with God’s help, if the gravestone is faded, we will replace it. It starts with our team doing the research. We get information from the cemetery to see if the veteran has a gravestone, no gravestone or a faded gravestone. The cemetery fills out the papers, and those papers go to the VA National Cemetery Administration, which then orders the headstones. The VA National Cemetery Administration sends the documents to the government, and the government approves the documents. Then the new gravestone is shipped to the cemetery, ”Jones said.

Jones was a Civil War reenactor for 16 years. He no longer participates in the reenactments because he suffers from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, he is still a local historian and his current occupation is working as a security guard for Remco Security in Youngstown. Jones is now working on a World War I veteran project.

“Our research team is currently gathering information through obituaries and The Vindicator articles on WWI veterans in the region. We carry out this project detail by detail, taking pictures of the soldiers for the newspaper and receiving letters they wrote during the war. With this project we also get the list of victims. I have the impression that we don’t talk a lot about the First World War and that we have to remember the veterans of that period. Plus, I think you also have to remember the veterans of the War of 1812, the Mexican-American War and the Boxer Rebellion, ”Jones said.

REWARDING PROJECTS

Jones has been involved in many rewarding projects over the years to commemorate the lives of area veterans. One of the most rewarding projects he’s been involved in was securing a historic marker on Civil War veteran Oscar D. Boggess’s property on Edwards Street in Youngstown. This historic site is known as Oscar D. Boggess Homestead.

“We had a committee dedicated to Oscar D. Boggess, a Black American Civil War Union veteran. This historical marker was the first dedicated not only to a Civil War veteran, but the first historical marker dedicated to a Black American Civil War soldier from the Mahoning Valley, ”Jones said.

Another rewarding project Jones was involved in was adding Private Jacob Nixon Robinson’s name to the statue of the man on the monument in the Central Square (Federal Square) in downtown Youngstown. Jacob Nixon Robinson was a Black American Civil War Union veteran. He is buried in Hampton National Cemetery in Virginia. This project was the vision of Anthony Feldes of Youngstown, who is dedicated to veterans in the region. Feldes, a Korean and Vietnam War veteran, noticed that no black American veteran’s name was inscribed on the Civil War monument when he returned from Vietnam. Feldes worked with Jones and Tom Anderson, local civic leader, to get Robinson’s name on the statue of the man at the monument.

To suggest a profile on Saturday, contact Editor-in-Chief Burton Cole at bcole@tribtoday.com or Metro Editor-in-Chief Marly Reichert at mreichert@tribtoday.com.

news@vindy.com

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Pennsylvania Family Gifts Mourning Liberty Hill Family Handmade Flags https://20thcvetsmem.org/pennsylvania-family-gifts-mourning-liberty-hill-family-handmade-flags/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/pennsylvania-family-gifts-mourning-liberty-hill-family-handmade-flags/ Family from Pennsylvania travels to central Texas, grieving gifts of flags hand-made by the family A family in Pennsylvania gave a special gift to a Liberty Hill family who have lost a veteran loved one. LIBERTY HILL, Texas – Dylan Bowen, 27, loved to serve his country. He served six years in the US Navy. […]]]>

Dylan Bowen, 27, loved to serve his country. He served six years in the US Navy.

“He was a very adventurous person. He loved to travel, discover the cultures of different countries,” said his mother Marcia Freeman.

When he returned home, the war still followed him. Bowen ended up taking his own life in 2021, leaving his family in indescribable pain.

“I don’t think they should have to fight their demons alone. I wish that was what my brother knew,” said Dakota Freeman, her brother.

A year later, the Liberty Hill family came to the Veterans Memorial in Cedar Park to reflect on their loved one and remember the life they lived. Little did they know Carrie Hendershot and her family would deliver handmade, satin-finished flags with the weight of plaques in Bowen’s honor.

“I am speechless, Marcia said.

The Hendershots traveled from Pennsylvania to hand deliver the two flags. They hope to release data from the Department of Veterans Affairs that 22 veterans kill themselves per day.

“We love being able to present something in honor of a loved one to a family, but it’s also very sad because our work kind of stems from a tragedy,” said Hendershot.

The Freemans will continue to visit the park each year to reflect on Bowen’s life, and they want to remind veterans that they are never alone.

“Talk to people. Talk to your loved ones. No matter how strong you think you have to be, you don’t have to be that strong. You have more people who love you than you think,” said Brad Freeman, his father. .

If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255. The service is free.

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City DDA will work with the Hometown Heroes banner program https://20thcvetsmem.org/city-dda-will-work-with-the-hometown-heroes-banner-program/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:15:17 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/city-dda-will-work-with-the-hometown-heroes-banner-program/ CHEBOYGAN – The Cheboygan Town Center Development Authority will work with an organization to honor local veterans, City Manager Dan Sabolsky said late last month. In September, city council heard a presentation from Abby Cherry regarding a Hometown Heroes exhibit that could potentially be set up in the town of Cheboygan. Cherry is originally from […]]]>

CHEBOYGAN – The Cheboygan Town Center Development Authority will work with an organization to honor local veterans, City Manager Dan Sabolsky said late last month.

In September, city council heard a presentation from Abby Cherry regarding a Hometown Heroes exhibit that could potentially be set up in the town of Cheboygan. Cherry is originally from Sault Ste. Marie, in the Upper Peninsula. She was a municipal commissioner in Sault Ste. Marie, and worked for a non-profit organization, which started the Hometown Heroes project.

The Council agreed to create a contract with the group at this meeting, to honor the local Cheboygan veterans with these banners.

“I think this deal shouldn’t be between the city and the Hometown Heroes group, Sabolsky said. “I think it should be with the DDA and the folks at Hometown Heroes. I think what we need to do is send a letter of support to the DDA saying, ‘Hey look, we’re in favor of this, go ahead and keep going. ‘”

Project Hometown Heroes – as presented to council in September – would place banners in different areas, with photos and names of local veterans with a code that people can scan with their smartphones.

to know everything about the person and his personal history. This gives community members and visitors the opportunity to learn more about the untold stories of these veterans.

Following:Hometown Heroes Presents to Honor Cheboygan Region Veterans

It also helps bridge the generation gap, helping the younger ones discover those who sacrificed themselves for the country.

In September, the plans included banners around the Veterans Memorial Park on Court Street, as well as in several other key areas of the city. It would cost the city nothing and there are several options with regard to the contract for the banners, starting with a two-year commitment.

Abby Cherry attended the Cheboygan City Council meeting on September 28 to discuss the potential to bring the Hometown Heroes Project to the town of Cheboygan, to honor local veterans by telling their stories and posting their photos in the neighborhoods from the city.

Several other communities in northern Michigan have these banners displayed in their downtown areas, including Sault Ste. Marie, Rudyard, Saint-Ignace and Pickford. City of Cheboygan Main Street-Downtown Development Authority Acting Director Katie Duczkowski and Phil Oppenheiser – a member of the local VFW Post – both expressed support for the city’s program at the September 28 meeting. from last year.

Sabolsky said at the last city council meeting that he and Duczkowski were working on the deal between the city and the Hometown Heroes group.

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Richard Carbonneau | Death notice | journaltime.com https://20thcvetsmem.org/richard-carbonneau-death-notice-journaltime-com/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://20thcvetsmem.org/richard-carbonneau-death-notice-journaltime-com/ April 16, 1946 – December 27, 2021 Richard A. Carbonneau, aged 75, passed away on Monday, December 27, 2021 at Boland Hall at the Veteran’s Home in Union Grove. Richard was born in Racine on April 16, 1946, son of the late Clarence and Ione (née: Friss) Carbonneau. Dick was a proud “Class of 1964” […]]]>

April 16, 1946 – December 27, 2021

Richard A. Carbonneau, aged 75, passed away on Monday, December 27, 2021 at Boland Hall at the Veteran’s Home in Union Grove. Richard was born in Racine on April 16, 1946, son of the late Clarence and Ione (née: Friss) Carbonneau.

Dick was a proud “Class of 1964” graduate of St. Catherine’s High School and later received his bachelor’s degree from Dominican College. He proudly served in the US Air Force. On June 14, 1975, he married Patricia Michna. They later divorced but have remained friends to this day. Dick led the St. John Credit Union for thirty years and was last working at the Southern Lakes Credit Union, where he helped people with their financial needs with respect, integrity and kindness. For many years he enjoyed playing golf with his friends, exercising, watching movies and sports, singing and listening to music, playing pool, playing card games, joking with friends and spending quality time with his family. He felt called to share his inherent love and joy with others. Dick was a kind and generous man who will be remembered for his sense of humor, great love and dedication to his family, as well as his determination and courage while living fully with Parkinson’s disease for over 15 years. year.

Dick will be sadly missed by his children, Paul Carbonneau of Racine, Claire (Christopher) Nelson of Whitefish Bay; grandchildren, Celia, Reece and Kai Nelson; brother, John Carbonneau; sister, Susan (John) Lofton; sister-in-law, Joni Carbonneau; brother-in-law, Frank Pfarr; former wife and friend, Pat Carbonneau, Al and Angie Nelson; nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. In addition to his parents, Dick was also predeceased by his brother, Robert; sister, Lois Pfarr; and young sisters, June and Nancy.

Visitations for relatives and friends will be held at the funeral home on Wednesday, January 5, 2022, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. A private Christian burial mass will be held at St. Richard’s Catholic Church. Interment will be held at the Southern Wisconsin Veterans Memorial Cemetery. Memorials to the Parkinson’s Foundation have been suggested.

The family especially thank the staff at the Veterans’ Home in Union Grove for their loving and compassionate care. Put on your favorite golden-oldie and sing a tribute to Richard.

MARESH-MEREDITH & ACKLAM FUNERAL AND CREMATORY HALL

Please send your condolences to www.meredithfuneralhome.com

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