Veterans Club Inc. Hosts Motorcycle Ride to Raise Money to Reduce Growing Suicide Rate for Veterans

0

After battling the terrorist threat overseas, Army veteran Mel Williams returned home to find his fellow soldiers fighting their own war. She found that nearly 20 vets a day across the country kill themselves. “While we’re busy we’re fine,” Williams said. “It’s when we’re not busy and slowing down, or when we don’t have people around. This is when things start to happen to us. his community struggled with isolation. It continued to build up in her until last September when she hit a breaking point. “I told my husband we had to do something for the Veterans Club,” Williams said. “I said we have to give back, we have to take a ride together.” She and her husband Mike Williams have a motorcycle club called the Exodus Saints. They decided to team up with the Veterans Club Inc. to host an event called Red, White and Thunder Motorcycle Ride. They invited vets and community members to join a biker caravan heading to Frankfurt to raise awareness about veteran suicide and raise money for help. . “If you can save one life, it’s a good day. If you can save three or four, it’s a good day.” The event is now in its second year and on Friday over 100 runners joined the event. They managed to raise just over $ 3,100, more than double the amount they raised last year. The money will go directly to the Veterans Club Inc. to help make sure local vets have the resources they need to tackle the problem. According to Veterans Club founder Jeremy Harrell, the event was as successful as he had hoped. He was looking to raise more money because he said this year alone the veteran suicide rate increased by 20%. “In two weeks we had 12 veterans who were on the verge of suicide,” Harrell said. “We cannot stop at this issue. We recognize that veteran suicide does not wait until the end of the pandemic.” Harrell said the money will not only go to veteran suicide prevention efforts, but also to families who have lost a veteran to suicide. He said now that they know what they’re capable of, the plan is to make the event bigger and better next year. “Next year we want three or four hundred runners with us,” Harrell said. “We can’t do it, and we don’t want to do it without community involvement.” According to a report from the Department of Veterans Affairs, the suicide rate among veterans has increased by almost 50% since 2005.

After battling the terrorist threat overseas, Army veteran Mel Williams returned home to find his fellow soldiers fighting their own war. She found that nearly 20 vets a day across the country kill themselves.

“While we’re busy we’re fine,” Williams said. “It’s when we’re not busy and we slow down, or when we don’t have people around. That’s when things start to happen to us.”

Be a member of the Veterans Club Inc. in Shelbyville, she saw first-hand how veterinarians in her community were struggling with isolation. It continued to build up in her until last September when she hit a breaking point.

“I told my husband we had to do something for the Veterans Club,” Williams said. “I said we have to give back, we have to take a ride together.”

She and her husband Mike Williams have a motorcycle club called the Exodus Saints. They decided to team up with the Veterans Club Inc. to host an event called Red, White and Thunder Motorcycle Ride. They invited vets and community members to join a biker caravan heading to Frankfurt to raise awareness about veteran suicide and raise money for help.

“We just thought of whatever we can do to help them, we have to stand up and do,” said Mike Williams. “If you can save one life, it’s a good day. If you can save three or four, it’s a great day.”

The event is now in its second year and on Friday over 100 runners joined the event. They managed to raise just over $ 3,100, more than double the amount they raised last year. The money will go directly to the Veterans Club Inc. to help make sure local vets have the resources they need to tackle the problem.

According to Jeremy Harrell, founder of the Veterans Club, the event was as successful as he had hoped. He was looking to raise more money because he said this year alone the veteran suicide rate increased by 20%.

“In two weeks we had 12 veterans who were on the verge of suicide,” Harrell said. “We cannot stop at this issue. We recognize that veteran suicide does not wait until the end of the pandemic.”

Harrell said the money will not only go to veteran suicide prevention efforts, but also to families who have lost a veteran to suicide. He said now that they know what they’re capable of, the plan is to make the event bigger and better next year.

“Next year we want three or four hundred runners with us,” Harrell said. “We can’t do it, and we don’t want to do it without the participation of the community.”

According to a report from the Department of Veterans Affairs, the suicide rate among veterans has increased by almost 50% since 2005.


Source link

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.